Tag Archives: Peter Nelson

Watch 1st Scene Reading of THE ARV, by Joshua Collins

Watch THE ARV 1st Scene Reading:

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Fran Townend
ALAYAS – Sean Ballantyne
MARK/MARDALE – Peter Nelson
VOICE OVER – Becky Shrimpton
Steven – Bubba

Get to know the writer Joshua Collins:

1. What is your screenplay about?

In short, the film is about a lethal obsession and how it can alter a persons perception of their world. As well as a very uncovered subject matter(in film)–aero-technology.

But overall, the experience might leave (hopefully) wondering/discussing idea’s that have never crossed their minds regarding aero-technology and energy sources.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Considering the state of our world’s condition and the struggle we find ourselves trying to right a very evident problem, the film is a different look at what is more than possible (via-solutions). It also gives light to the ‘why’ on more than one occasion, but utilizing a fun and impacting format to do so. Rather than a documentary this film could speak with people of all ages by way of classic film-making.

The film could open up doors for many conversations that just aren’t happening, and that’s sad.

3. How would you describe this story in one sentence?

The ARV can only be experienced and yet hard to believe its happening.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

There isn’t just one, there’s never just one:

Tarkovsky’s STALKER
Michael Haneke’s THE SEVENTH CONTINENT
KUBRIKS 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY

5. This is a very tight, emotionally engaging and fun screenplay. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Research took well over a year, but the writing took about two months.

6. How many stories have you written?

A lot. A lot, a lot.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I was blown away that the sci-fi/drama genre was lacking in anything that dealt with a real human problem–sustainable energy source.

Also that many films that ever dealt with anything extra-terrestrial based were far too cliché and over-done. This film, THE ARV, finally gives a real life look at the reality of such a complex subject matter.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Having to learn quantum physics on an elementary level to create the real dialogue the story contains. One cannot simply make it up or just learn ‘key phrases’. A lot of scientists would go see this film and the last thing I’d want is to be laughed at. So, having to learn the principles of General relativity, Newton’s Laws of Motion etc…

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Directing, directing, acting, music, life, Buddhism. And directing.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I was drawn to the festival based on its format. Hearing your screenplay read aloud by actors for the first time is a big plus.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Humans need stories to understand ourselves but at the same time to relinquish control of their perception’s. A writers job is to be responsible for what we give to them (the audience)…and in hopes that their perception is somewhat or altogether altered.

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Deadline: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL Get script performed at the festival. Full feedback

http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

Watch Best Scene Reading of CAPSTONE LOST AND FOUND, by Pamela Green

Watch Best Scene Reading of CAPSTONE LOST AND FOUND

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Kiran Friesen
EVERETT – Peter Nelson

Get to know writers Pamela Green:

1. What is your screenplay about?

After having been put through shock treatment and other psychiatric atrocities while locked away in a mental institution during the 1950’s, Everett is finally let go and begins his new life journey, where he has further divine encounters, as well as struggles, and is reminded of a divine promise and mandate, that his testimony from his hospital days will be used in a movie to warn the world of the coming mark in the forehead.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

It should be made into a movie because it includes a warning from God of a prophesied apocalyptic destruction that will hit mankind in the not-so-distant future. Also, it includes testimonies of God’s faithfulness toward those who put their trust Him, and highlights God’s love for the lost.

3. How would you describe this story in one sentence?

It depicts the life journey of Everett’s post-hospital days, including various struggles, encounters of divine nature, testimonies of the “lost” being found, and also sobering warnings about the coming mark of the Beast.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I have seen a lot of Disney movies over and over due to my children watching them, but I think the one I saw the most (that I myself wanted to see) was Meet Me in St. Louis.

5. This is a very tight, emotionally engaging, and fun screenplay. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I began writing the screenplay in May of 2009 (at first, both screenplays were combined) and have worked on it off and on since then.

6. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written two screenplays about my dad, with his input. I also wrote one about my life, but then tore it up.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

To begin with, my dad would often tell me as a child of his experiences in the hospital, including shock treatment, and he would often refer to this machine as “the beast”. He also mentioned a few times in my life about his promise from God that one day a movie would be made of his life that would be used to warn the world of the coming mark in the forehead. The “mark of the beast” was a common phrase I heard from my dad growing up. Then, a lot of things happened in my life after I went away to college that pointed me toward making the movie, such as God visiting me in a dream. But one day, in 2006 or 2007, after returning from visiting my parents and being reminded of the movie promise by my dad, I was sitting on my bed, wondering if there was something I could do to help him make the movie, and was asking God if He wanted me to help somehow when, suddenly, my husband rushed into the room and blurted out, ” Whatever the Lord tells you to do, you have to be obedient!”. But I was depressed and discouraged from various life trials and got to the point where I didn’t want to go on. Then one night at a laundromat a stranger approached me and prayed for me, saying, “You must live! You must live! You have a heavy calling that must be fulfilled! I then asked the lady what that calling was. She said “I don’t know.. but you do.” That night I went to sleep wondering what it could be. Then the next morning as soon as I woke up, the first thought that came to my mind was, “The movie! God wants me to make the movie!” The last straw was when I received the June, 2009 edition of the Johns Hopkins Newsletter (I received it early, in May of 2009) that was highlighting shock treatment as a way to treat depression. My dad had always said that one day shock treatment would be revived and it would be endorsed and pushed on the public masses instead of just poor souls locked away and forgotten in mental hospitals.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Much of the time, I either didn’t have a home computer, or didn’t have word processing on my home computer, or my computer would break. I went to the library a lot and had to pay my kids to watch the younger kids a lot of times, coming from the $25 per week that I could use for making the movie. I also thought that I was finished many times and would print off the script, only to find that I had more corrections to make. Also, getting the information from my dad and piecing it together in the right sequence was very tricky. Some events he couldn’t always remember the exact order in which they occurred, so I had to kind of do trial and error. Plus, he lives long distance from me, so sometimes it was difficult to get a hold of him when I had a question.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Most of all, I love Jesus, and am thankful to Him for saving my soul and always loving me and being there for me. I also love the Bible and love to hear preaching and love to sing and listen to singing, especially Christian songs. I love and am thankful for my family. I love all people, in general, especially children, orphans, and elderly, and the handicapped, discouraged, abused, addicts, and poor, and lost souls. I would somehow like to help mankind, like having a ministry to the poor, or working with children, or helping families, or praying for the discouraged or sick. I’ve been miraculously healed many times, so I definitely believe in healing. I love to tell others that Jesus can save them and give them eternal life and that He has a great plan for them. I like to encourage people, especially those who feel like giving up, and let them know that Jesus makes life worth living. Even in our difficult situations, we can still pray and trust God and know that He can work things out for our good and that He has our best interest at heart. I love beautiful things, like rainbows, and beautiful colors, and butterflies, and flowers, and beautiful old houses, and the great outdoors. I also love to bake, and I love animals, and art, especially drawing, painting, and crafts. My dad loves to sing and play the steel guitar and sometimes writes poetry, and likes to paint and do carpentry.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival? What were your
feelings on the initial feedback you received?

One day, a few years back, I asked the Lord to direct me concerning what I should do next with the movie. Then I had a dream that I was standing before a desk and a man was seated at the desk, holding my script. In the dream, I asked the man if he liked the script. He said “Yes… we loved it.” Then I looked over to the left of the desk and there was George Clooney, kind of leaning in toward the desk. He looked at me and said “Got any part for me?” Then, days later, I remembered the dream again and went to George Clooney’s Facebook page and pressed the “like” button. Then, I started receiving advertisements from his page for WILDsound Film Festival all the time. But when I thought about what I should do, I still wasn’t sure until, one month, I believed the Lord was pushing me to enter during that particular month, since it was the month of the “blue moon”. But I didn’t listen fully to understand what God was saying, for, assuming that I had the whole month to enter the contest, which had been running regularly for a long while, instead closed up before the end of the month, so I missed it. Then a preacher friend on Facebook randomly said that sometimes in life we may be alert and ready, then, all of a sudden, we aren’t paying attention and drop the ball. When she said that, I realized I had missed my opportunity. Then, a few months ago, a preacher on Facebook said that God was giving someone another chance, that a certain situation would come around again, set up just how it was before, “only this time”, he warned, “don’t drop the ball”. So, I took that as my cue that the Lord wanted me to enter the contest.

I was very excited to receive the feedback from WILDsound. It was great to actually hear what someone else had to say regarding the script, especially in an in-depth way, and at a professional level. I believe that I was given a lot of great wisdom and practical pointers that have helped to open my eyes and improve my movie-writing skills.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Try not to be in such a hurry to finish your screenplay or else it may actually end up taking much longer than you had anticipated due to overlooked mistakes. Take your time and, in the long run, end up saving time. “Haste makes waste.” Backing away from it for a while and then returning can help give you a fresh, new perspective. I believe it would be good to use a screenwriting program. I didn’t, but I think it would have made some things a great deal easier and quicker. Another thing, it’s good to give yourself breaks and enough sleep, and be sure and get exercise and eat right. You will feel like doing a better job if you take good care of yourself and are more relaxed and healthy.

    * * * *

DEADLINE: Submit your best scene from your screenplay. Have it performed using professional actors:
http://www.wildsound.ca/submit_your_favorite_scene.html

Watch Best Scene Reading of COMIC CONS, by Peter Harmon and Larry Postel

Watch COMIC CONS Best Scene Reading:

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Jane Smythe
DANNY – Peter Nelson
ZOE – Becky Shrimpton
ALEX – Sean Ballantyne
LANDO – Bubba

Get to know writers Peter Harmon and Larry Postel:

1. What is your screenplay about?

It’s about two escaped convicts who hide out as cosplayers at a Comic Con and plan a big con to win the cash prize at the Cosplay Competition. But the underlying theme of the story is how these two guys change through this new world they encounter, which is so honest and real – as opposed to their former lives of deception and manipulation as con artists.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

With the global explosion of cosplay and comic con/conventions, COMIC CONS should have universal appeal — both here and abroad. In addition to COMIC CONS having a high concept (and low budget), it also has strong characters that will engage the audience.

3. This story has a lot going for it. How would you describe this screenplay in one sentence?

COMIC CONS is a buddy comedy about a pair of con artists on the run who hide out as cosplayers at a Comic Con.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Co-writer Larry Postel: Cinema Paradiso. I took an Italian Cinema course in college and loved Italian movies ever since. Cinema Paradiso is one of my favorites and the soundtrack is the best ever.

Co-writer Pete Harmon: Toy Story. It came out when I was the perfect age to really latch onto it and now that I have a son myself it’s one of his favorites.

5. This is a very tight, emotionally engaging and fun screenplay. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Two years.

6. How many stories have you written?

Co-writer Pete Harmon: I can’t even quantify the amount of stories I’ve written as I’ve been writing since I was young. I don’t feel whole if I’m not in the midst of a screenplay or an outline or a novel.

Co-writer Larry Postel: Good answer, Pete. I’ll second that motion.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

The love of buddy comedies where cons on the run find a place to hide out and blend in with the scenery — and then end up actually loving the place and the people, which inspires them to change for the better (and also change the lives of those they encounter). With that said, the two movies in particular that inspired this screenplay were HAPPY, TEXAS and WE’RE NO ANGELS.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Taking notes from so many people and then doing rewrites to make it the best it can be. Of course, we know that there will always be more rewrites to come and that’s always part of the process. In fact, it’s the most important part of the process.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Co-writer Larry Postel: My family, my dogs, reading, music, and travel.

Co-writer Pete Harmon: I’m also passionate about my family, my friends, rap music, 90s era basketball shoes, caffeinated beverages, and discovering movies and books and podcasts that speak to me.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival?

It’s a great forum for aspiring writers and filmmakers to showcase their work.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Co-writer Larry Postel: Many say that you should write what you know. Better yet is to write what you know combined with what you feel.

Co-writer Pete Harmon: If you truly want to be a writer you’ve already been writing
and you make time to write. If writing is something you would like to do then you’re not a writer, and that’s fine, maybe at some point you will be.

    * * * * *

DEADLINE: Submit your best scene from your screenplay. Have it performed using professional actors:
http://www.wildsound.ca/submit_your_favorite_scene.html

Watch Feature Screenplay Reading of BROWNIE AND FRAN by Arthur S Brown & Rory Leahy

Watch Performance Reading of BROWNIE AND FRAN:

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Jason Martorino
BROWNIE – Scott Beaudin
FRAN – Meghan Allen
TRAVERS/DAVID – Cole Reid
SHAYGETZ/HOWIE/LOU – Peter Nelson
KAPLAN/BERTHA/PAULINE – Julie Burris
ZELLY – Andrei Preda

Get to know writer Arthur S. Brown:

1. What is your screenplay about?

Brooklyn, NY 1948. The cold war is heating up, and mob entrenchment is at its peak. The U.S. is running a victory lap. Returning veterans want their share of the pie, and they’re willing to strike for it. Two young idealists meet, fall in love, and set out to save the world – while not getting corrupted doing it. These lovers are my parents, and most of the story is true.

2. Why should this script be made into a movie?

It reveals a time and place where so many conflicting forces were in play, and it was unclear which would prevail. It’s a tale with great historic scope and modern relevance. Worker’s and civil rights vs the rise of the modern corporation. Organized crime’s entrenchment in trade unionism. Themes still at play in the body politic – and two starry-eyed people skipping gleefully across the mine field.

3. How long have you been writing stories?

Do you believe in past lives?

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Favorite film hands down is Wizard of Oz. It delights on so many levels. It has wisdom (the hero you seek is within), adventure, existential struggle (“home” vs “out there.”), and of course music.

By the way, the spoken moral of the film is of course, “.. there’s no place like home.” I submit that the true moral is “somewhere over the rainbow” – leave home and seek adventure. I say that because we know that a day or so after the film ends, Dorothy is sure is hell not staying in Kansas.

5. What artists would you love to work with?

So many – Actors: Christoph Waltz, Steve Carell, Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Dustin Hoffman, Jennifer Lawrence, Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Scarlett Johansson… Directors: Tarentino, Woody Allen, Linklater, Alejandro Inarritu, Joel Coen…

6. How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I’m the author of “Vegetarian Dining in NYC”, and “Everything I need to know, I learned from Cartoons!” I occasionally work as an actor and standup comedian. As a lyricist in the BMI Lehman Engels musical theatre workshop (which gave us “Little shop of horrors”, “Avenue Q”, and many others), I developed and produced a number of exciting projects, a couple of which are approaching completion (can’t be specific at this moment).

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

Jack Kerouac commented in an interview (and I paraphrase), that “no man can write a book about his father.” I took up the challenge. He also said, “Write in recollection and amazement for yourself.” I have. I believe my story is extremely relevant.

Has class warfare ended? Are working people still struggling against CEOs for a fair wage and basic rights? Do idealists still fall in love and try to save the world?

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for
writing?

I find Final Draft enormously helpful. I like to develop an outline – what’s the story about? I write quickly. And when I’m
ready, I get eyes on it.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Standup comedy, growing tomatoes, as much sex as my wife will allow me, and bike riding.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival? Did the
initial feedback you received from the festival help your
screenplay?

I’m very grateful for the feedback from WILDsound. It was specific and on point. It helped me immensely.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Get an office job with a monitor facing the wall. Write – and
write quickly. Kill your darlings. Put your ego aside and let the characters tell their stories through you. Write some more. Keep writing.

    * * * * *

Deadline: FEATURE Screenplay Festival – Get FULL FEEDBACK. Get script performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsound.ca/screenplaycontest.html

Watch WINNING Screenplay Readings – Watch videos of past winners performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/feature_script_readings.html

READ 100s of testimonials from past submitters –
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/feature-screenplay-submission-testimonials-wildsound-screenplay-contest-review

Best Scene from CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM Spec by Chris Agnew (plus interview)

    Watch the Best Scene Script from CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM Spec:

CAST LIST:

Narrator – Becky Shrimpton

Larry – Peter Nelson

Leon – Peter Bent

Ms. Kotchery – Michelle Lecky

Patricia – Mandy Mclean

Get to know writer Chris Agnew:

1. What is your TV Curb Your Enthusiasm spec script about?

Larry takes exception to a speed bump installed in his community by a power hungry English Lady. A visit from his nephew complicates things as his rivalries become intermingled with Leon.

2. Why does this script fit into the context of the show?

Annoying societal things and people conspiring to bring Larry down.

3. How long have you been writing stories?

I started writing a year and a half ago.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Probably Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, I must have watched it at least 20 times in college. I still laugh like a madman everytime.

5. What artists would you love to work with?

Larry David, Ricky Gervais, Johnny Dep, Jim Carey, Martin Scorsese, Jack Nicholson, Dave Chappelle, Will Ferrell, Chris Rock, Kate McKinnon, Bill Burr, Zack Woods, Anthony Atamanuik.

6. How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I’ve written a pilot, a spec, a full length, two short films, 30 or so sketches and 10 or so short stories.

7. Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

Making films and tv with great people that inspire and make people laugh till they cry.

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I study similar things that have been made, try to copy their approach in a number of ways, make a few tweeks, then brainstorm, structure, brainstorm, structure, write, rewrite. If something isn’t working, move on and come back.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Friends, traveling, snowboard, bball, surf and would like to start a nonprofit in the future.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival?

Quick feedback for a contest and unique chance for a reading of material.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

I really need all the advice I can get. Copy the best, I learned infinitely more from studying Curb than any book or class. Study the thing you want to make.

Interview with Michael Miceli, Feature Screenplay Winner (BESA)

WILDsound has a reputation for providing on-the-money professional feedback for each submission. I like to enter every project I do in WILDsound because it is a great barometer for comparing your work to what is hot in the industry.

– Michael Miceli, on the WILDsound experience (review)

    Watch the Winning Feature Script Reading of BESA

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Sedina Fiati
    Gino – Peter Nelson
    Ilir – Roman Spera
    Uke – Jarrid Terrell
    Carmine Jr. – Robert Notman
    Valbona – Erynn Brook
    Valbona – Steve Rizzo

Matthew Toffolo interviews winning writer Michael Miceli:

Matthew: What is your screenplay about?

Besa is the story of a loyal Italian father, forced to defend his son who has inadvertently sparked a New York mob war between Sicilian and Albanian crime families.

Matthew: Why should this script be made into a movie?

Besa is based on the electrifying novel by Louis Romano, who did an incredible job of capturing the criminal world as it exists today. Our version of the mafia is a weak fossil of what has been depicted in films over the past forty years. The real power is in the fresh blood: Albanians and Russians.

Matthew: How long have you been writing stories?

I wrote my first script when I was in second grade. It was for puppet show I put on for my class about a very lucky dog. Before I could write, I used to draw stories, frame by frame, on a piece of paper and then pull the paper past a make shift projector I had made – which was a flashlight aimed through a toilet paper tube, shining onto my bedroom wall. So I guess you could say storytelling and “filmmaking” has been there since the beginning for me.

Matthew: What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I saw “Raiders of the Lost Ark” twice in the theatre when I was 4 years old. The moment that boulder came rolling , I was hooked.

Matthew: What artists would you love to work with?

Working or not, I’d love to be in the same room with Steven Spielberg for an hour with the hope that I’d catch whatever he has. E.T., Jaws, and Schindler’s List are three completely different genres and he mastered them all.

Matthew: How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I have written 13 feature film scripts. Most recently, “Beautiful Me”, a faith-based film being produced by Restoring Truth Media, and “Chimerism”, a medical thriller being produced by Girl On a Rocking Horse Productions. Both are going into production in 2015.

Matthew: Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

On set, anywhere, bringing a script to the screen.

Matthew: Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

Characters first. Once you’ve written everybody’s whole life from birth to the first page of your script, then you’re ready to begin the journey. From there, I don’t try to structure creativity. I write out of order, just tackling any scene as it grows out of my mind. The smoothing out comes in subsequent drafts.

Matthew: Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I have three little kids that seem to be passionate about everything. So I am passionate about them being passionate about everything.

Matthew: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Every writer should always remember the golden rule of screenwriting: simple story, complex characters. If you can do that, you’re more than half way there.