Tag Archives: documentary

Today’s FilmFreeway: DOCUMENTARY Short Film Festival

Watching the reactions of (German Shepherd) at the FEEDBACK Festival does not become more meaningful than that. When your film reaches and audience that respond in such way, it´s pure joy.
– Nils Bergendal, Director “German Shepherd”

Next Festival Dates:
November 24th
March 30th

Festival takes place at the Carlton Cinemas in downtown Toronto, Canada.

FULL FEEDBACK on your film from the audience! SUBMIT ANYTIME!
Submissions take 3-7 weeks for evaluation.

Why the this is the fastest growing Documentary Film Festival in the world today:

– Your film will get screened in front of a large, broad audience.

– We are a feedback festival and you will actually hear what people and action/adventure film lovers think of your film.

– Your film is screened and then talked about with the audience, lead by a Professional Industry moderator.

Even if your film is not selected, you will receive the full feedback from the viewing committee. The goal of the Film Festival is to help everyone involved grow as an artist, so we will offer some kind of constructive criticism whether or not we accept your entry for the formal festival. If your film is not accepted, you are allowed to re-submit (sans any entry fee) using the suggested changes the committee made.

Read more testimonials of recent filmmakers who had their short documentary film showcased at the festival:

Hearing the audience’s responses compelled me to raise the bar of what I should have expected from myself in making this film. The feedback video is a great concept and I cannot express how important it was to have it as a record of the viewing experience at time when I could not be present for the screening.
– Vinit Parmar, Director “Quest for Energy”

I’ve had my work shown in festivals before but I’ve never had the experience of being in a room with 100 people all engaging in a discussion about a film I made. The coolest part of it was seeing that people in audience who I didn’t think would enjoy the film giving positive feedback about it. I always pictured that you would need to have some sort of understanding of death-metal music to enjoy the film but I couldn’t be more pleased to discover that wasn’t the case.
– Sean Singh, Director of “Suburban Deathcore”

I was thrilled with the audience response to the film. Some people in particular really “got” it, pointing to the words “and yet” in the opening haiku as the hint of hopefulness in the film. The shot of the school of fish shifting direction connotes that hope of a shift in consciousness.
– Elizabeth Thompson, Director of “This Dewdrop World”

Watching the audience feedback on my film made me so happy. I wish I could have been there. I love people who are open minded and ready to see with their heart. And I love cinema. As most of the people there love movies too.
– Laura Lehmus, Director of “Alienation”

It’s always nice to hear feedback. I am glad that a lot of the audience saw Jeff as an inspiration to be yourself no matter what others might think of you.
– March Mercanti, Director of “Toy Boy”

I was very grateful for the feedback video and the audience comments. It was wonderful to hear what the audience thought of the film. Out of the nearly 300 film festivals that have screened Not Anymore: A Story of Revolution, none have ever provided me a feedback video and it was greatly appreciated.
– Matthew Van Dyke, Director of “NOT ANYMORE: A STORY OF REVOLUTION”

Submit via FilmFreeway:

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FilmFreeway Special: Submit to the DOCUMENTARY Film Festival

Watching the reactions of (German Shepherd) at the FEEDBACK Festival does not become more meaningful than that. When your film reaches and audience that respond in such way, it´s pure joy.
– Nils Bergendal, Director “German Shepherd”

Next Festival Dates:
November 24 2016
February 23 2016

Festival takes place at the Carlton Cinemas in downtown Toronto, Canada.

FULL FEEDBACK on your film from the audience! SUBMIT ANYTIME!
Submissions take 3-7 weeks for evaluation.

SUBMIT via FILMFREEWAY: 

Why the this is the fastest growing Documentary Film Festival in the world today:

– Your film will get screened in front of a large, broad audience.

– We are a feedback festival and you will actually hear what people and action/adventure film lovers think of your film.

– Your film is screened and then talked about with the audience, lead by a Professional Industry moderator.

Even if your film is not selected, you will receive the full feedback from the viewing committee. The goal of the Film Festival is to help everyone involved grow as an artist, so we will offer some kind of constructive criticism whether or not we accept your entry for the formal festival. If your film is not accepted, you are allowed to re-submit (sans any entry fee) using the suggested changes the committee made.

Read more testimonials of recent filmmakers who had their short documentary film showcased at the festival:

Hearing the audience’s responses compelled me to raise the bar of what I should have expected from myself in making this film. The feedback video is a great concept and I cannot express how important it was to have it as a record of the viewing experience at time when I could not be present for the screening.
– Vinit Parmar, Director “Quest for Energy”

I’ve had my work shown in festivals before but I’ve never had the experience of being in a room with 100 people all engaging in a discussion about a film I made. The coolest part of it was seeing that people in audience who I didn’t think would enjoy the film giving positive feedback about it. I always pictured that you would need to have some sort of understanding of death-metal music to enjoy the film but I couldn’t be more pleased to discover that wasn’t the case.
– Sean Singh, Director of “Suburban Deathcore”

I was thrilled with the audience response to the film. Some people in particular really “got” it, pointing to the words “and yet” in the opening haiku as the hint of hopefulness in the film. The shot of the school of fish shifting direction connotes that hope of a shift in consciousness.
– Elizabeth Thompson, Director of “This Dewdrop World”

Documentary Short Film Fest Thur. May 26th. Get to know each film.

SPECIAL EVENT: Featuring the best of Documentary Short Films from around the world. Films from USA, Canada, Netherlands, Jordan, UK, Italy, and Argentina.

Thursday May 26th event. Carlton Cinemas, 20 Carlton Street.

First Screening - 7pm to 9pm - Best of Foreign Documentary Shorts:
http://www.wildsound.ca/torontofilmfestivals.html

Second Screening - 9:10pm to 11pm - Best of North American Documentary
Shorts:
http://www.wildsound.ca/torontodocumentaryfilmfestival.html

You can RSVP for either event, or both. Plus, see full details of every
film being played.

SHADOW OF A GIANT:
SHADOW OF A GIANT Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

THE LAST TEAR:
THE LAST TEAR Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

CASTE A WAVE:
CASTE A WAVE Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

PLANE SPOTTING:
PLANE SPOTTING Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

WRESTLING ZA'ATARI:
WRESTLING ZA’ATARI Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

#UNITED WE WIN: 
#UNITED WE WIN Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

1MINUTE NATURE:
1MINUTE NATURE Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

LIKE A STAR:
LIKE A STAR Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

EVERYBODY FALLS DOWN:
EVERYBODY FALLS DOWN Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

CHAMPION:
CHAMPION Short Film – Playing at the May 26th Doc Short Film Fest

Fifth event of 2016. Festival all 12 months this year! RSVP your
FEEDBACK Toronto Film Festival seats.

FREE OR MAKE A DONATION TO THE FESTIVAL via the program page.

This month's festival is a packed lineup of the greatest documentary short films from the last year.

Giving you films from all corners of the world in different genres and formats. And there is a theme that ties all the films together. You pick the theme on the night and you win free movie tickets! Last month's theme was "Twist Endings".

Get to know short film: 1Minute Nature, 12min, Netherlands, Documentary/Animation

  MOVIE POSTER

Playing at the May 2016 Documentary Film Festival. Get your FREE Tickets

1Minute Nature, 12min, Netherlands, Documentary/Animation
Directed by Stefanie Visjager & Katinka Baehr

1Minute Nature is a series of short animated documentaries for children. We began by interviewing children, with the aim of creating 1minute real life stories with a fairytale feeling, and then bringing the audio to life with animation. The central topic is how children see and experience nature.

The audio is documentary, yet we make our interviews sound like fiction. This play on boundaries between fact and fiction is also reflected in the imagery; photographed objects from daily life are used as a 3D setting for the world in which 2D drawn characters live.

Both in audio and animation we aim to make children reflect on the world they live in and hopefully they will see the world in a slightly different way after 1Minute.

1Minute Nature is produced by a team of independent and Prix Europa Awarded radio producers in cooperation with a team of animators.

Director Statement:

“As a radio producer it is scary to put images to words, since the visual perception is so much stronger. Yet we wanted to try and I think we succeeded wonderfully. We kept the intimacy of a radio interview, enhancing it by animation. Both story and images (drawings on photographs) reflect a play on boundaries between fact and fiction.”

Website: http://www.radiomakersdesmet.nl/

Stef Visjager – Writer

Bente Hamel – Writer

Tjitske Mussche – Writer

Maartje Duin – Writer

Stef Visjager – Producer

Stef Visjager – Key Cast

Kris Kobes – Animation

Lotte van Dijck – Photography, Drawings

Get to know the Short Film REINVENTING THE REEL. Playing at the September 2015 Film Festival

RSVP your TICKETS to the Thursday Sept. 24th best of shorts film festival:
http://www.wildsound.ca/torontofilmfestivals.html

reinventing_the_reel_4REINVENTING THE REEL, 19min., Canada, Documentary
Directed by Michael Gorlick

Reinventing the Reel gives an overview of the Hollywood treatment of LGBT portrayals in film, how it has changed, and why is important to continue to change.

Summary of Film:

Reinventing the Reel is a documentary short that gives an overview of the Hollywood treatment of LGBT portrayals in film, how it has changed, and why is important to continue to change. This brief history is followed by an inside look into independent filmmakers in their process of breaking the chain of that negative history on a smaller scale (with the help of tools like crowd funding). They create films, in part, hoping that one day it will be more common in bigger Hollywood films to see more characters that happen to be gay rather than that be their reason for existing in the film’s storyline.

reinventing_the_reel_1
According to the Contact Hypothesis theory, the more a viewer sees (interacts with) a minority in film, the less prejudice they will have for that group, which is why it is so important for these filmmakers to continue their plight, to build a sense of commonality between people of all backgrounds. The main filmmaker followed is Casper Andreas, director and producer of Kiss Me Kill Me, a murder mystery based around a group of gay characters in West Hollywood. The Underlying message of the film is that waiting for the bigger businesses of the world to make necessary changes (social and otherwise) is not the answer.

reinventing_the_reel_5The proposed answer implied in this documentary is to make those changes and inspire others by participating in the infinite creative opportunities made possible when like-minded people get together to bring an idea to life themselves.

Interview with director Elizabeth Thompson (This Dewdrop World)

I was thrilled with the audience response to the film. Some people in particular really “got” it, pointing to the words “and yet” in the opening haiku as the hint of hopefulness in the film. The shot of the school of fish shifting direction connotes that hope of a shift in consciousness. Cynicism is what parades as truth when real strength and courage are lacking (I’m paraphrasing Cornel West here); I was trying to push up against cynicism with that shot. Some people got it, others missed it.

– Elizabeth Thompson on the WILDsound experience.

Interview with director Elizabeth Thompson on her documentary short film This Dewdrop World

Matthew Toffolo: Your short film played at our festival in June 2014. How has it done since it screened? Has it played at more festivals? Distribution deal? Can be seen online?

Elizabeth Thompson: This Dewdrop World is finishing a spirited festival run, where it has won numerous awards, including Best Director, Most Creative/Original (x2), Best of Fest (x2), and Best Disabilities Film.

A trailer of the film can be seen here: http://thisdewdropworldfilm.com/trailer/#.VKrqn0tvo-A

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Elizabeth Thompson: I wasn’t planning to make this film. But one day, my mother, who was struggling with the onset of Lou Gehrig’s Disease, turned to me and said, “I sense a window closing on my ability to speak. Can I talk to you on camera?”

Matthew Toffolo: From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this film?

Elizabeth Thompson: Three years.

Matthew Toffolo: What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Elizabeth Thompson: The biggest obstacle was that my mother passed away as I was editing the piece, so I was unable to reshoot anything. Another obstacle was funding. Funders just couldn’t see beyond the poetic approach I was taking to personal and planetary loss. They wanted either a film about loss associated with climate change or a film about losing my mother, not one that interweaved the two.

Matthew Toffolo: What film have you seen the most in your life?

Elizabeth Thompson: Sans Soleil by Chris Marker.

Matthew Toffolo: What is next for you? A new film?

Elizabeth Thompson: Yep, I can’t help myself. Only this time I’m diving into the world of fiction and am writing a screenplay. I’m also shooting a documentary about the eco-artists Helen and Newton Harrison.

    * * * * *

ELIZABETH THOMPSON – Director BIO

Elizabeth Thompson produced and directed Blink (Emmy Award, ITVS funding, P.O.V. broadcast) and co-produced For Better or Worse (Academy Award nomination). Her film Bookends was awarded the Jurors’ Choice Award from Black Maria Film Festival and Honorable Mention from the International Documentary Association.

Thompson’s work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, Sundance Documentary Fund, The Creative Work Fund and Paul Robeson Fund for Indepedent Media. Yaddo and MacDowell Colony have awarded her fellowships and artist residencies.

As a Camera Woman, she has worked on a number of award-winning documentaries, including Hansel Mieth: Vagabond Photographer (Independent Lens), Rachel’s Daughter (HBO), and Regret to Inform (Oscar and Emmy nominations).

She has twice taught at Stanford’s Graduate Program in Documentary Film. Thompson holds a B.A. from Duke University and an M.A. from Stanford University.

Matthew Toffolo, Interviewer BIO

Matthew Toffolo is the current CEO of the WILDsound Film and Writing Festival. He had worked for the organization since its inception in 2007 serving as the Short Film Festival’s moderator during the Audience Feedback sessions.

Filmmaker of over 20 short films and TV episodes. Took over full reins of the WILDsound Festival in May 2013. From then to the end of 2014, he’s presented over 90 movies at the monthly FEEDBACK Film Festival in Toronto, plus has had over 60 screenplays and stories performed by professional actors at the bi-monthly Writing Festival.

Go to http://www.wildsound.ca and submit your film, script, or story to the festival.

Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com and watch recent and past winning writing festival readings.