Tag Archives: katelyn vanier

Katelyn Vanier – ACTOR PERFORMING A SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL AUGUST 16 2018

Katelyn Vanier.jpg

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Watch the Winning FEATURE Screenplay for October 2016

CHARLOTTE SOMETIMES
Written by Cate Carson

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Family, Drama, Fantasy

After losing her mother, a vexed 9 y.o. girl discovers a dream machine hidden in her deaf father’s workshop, but an unexpected friendship with a quirky boy becomes the real cure to her loneliness.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Michelle Alexander
CHARLOTTE – Katelyn Varadi
OLIVER – Gabriel Darku
MS. GRAY – Sandy Kellerman
OLDER CHARLOTTE – Julie C. Sheppard
OLDER OLIVER – Rikki Wright

Get to know the winning writer:

What is your screenplay about?

After losing her mother, a vexed 8 y.o. girl discovers a dream machine hidden in her deaf father’s workshop, but an unexpected friendship with a quirky boy becomes the real cure to her loneliness.

What genres does your screenplay under?

Family/Holiday/Dramedy

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Everyone experiences grief and everyone needs love to heal. This film is one that can speak to all ages and will bring audiences on an adventure while making them laugh and cry, but most importantly – feel.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Quirky and endearing

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Liar Liar, Forrest Gump and either the Die Hard series or Lethal Weapon series. This is a very tough question.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Two years

How many stories have you written?

Probably around 10

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I heard of someone named Charlotte Sometimes, fell in love with it and built a character and story around it.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Making sure the whimsical fantasy elements aligned well with the real world. Making sure everything had a purpose. I was grateful for the extensive feedback from this festival because it helped me more critically analyze and fix this portion of my screenplay.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I am also a director, actor and producer. I own a company called Sensorium Pictures. Besides film I love creating other types of art, photography, the outdoors and am passionate about finding my place as a humanitarian. I have always wanted to help people and telling their stories is only one avenue for doing that.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Write and keep writing. Try to show your work to people who are better than you. There will always be someone with value to add. Submitting to a few festivals with script feedback can be a tremendous help – especially after you have exhausted your inner circle and want fresh eyes. Your friends and family count only if they know what they’re talking about.

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Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

TV Spec Screenplay – Modern Family by Chai Karve

Watch the September 2016 Winning TV SPEC Screenplay

Modern Family by Chai Karve

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Val Cole
ALEX – Mandy Magnan
PHIL/CAMERON – Devin Upham
JAY/MITCHELL – Neil Kulin
LILY/HALEY – Lauren Toffan
LUKE/MANNY – Scott Beaudin
CLAIRE/GLORIA – Katelyn Vanier

Get to know the writer:

What is your spec screenplay based on the famous TV show about?

All of the characters that usually get what they want need help. On a mushy-gushy level, it’s about realizing everyone’s potential for contribution and using the talents of everyone around you to solve a problem.

A plots: Alex tries to land an internship. Jay tries to learn technology. Haley tries to maintain a long-distance relationship. Mitchell tries to engage with Lily.

B plots: Gloria uses idioms to a fault. Claire and Phil jockey to help Alex. Luke offers sage relationship advice. Lily and Cameron are football bros.

How does this screenplay fit into the context of the TV show?

Most viewers will be able to relate to at least one of the storylines. It’s difficult acknowledging our shortcomings, and this episode deals with that in several contexts.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Fast & Relatable

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

Arrested Development and Veep. Both of these shows are so fast and terrifyingly witty. The number and diversity of jokes these shows have is staggering. I find new elements every time.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

The story was outlined in a week and I wrote a draft in 2 days. Once I locked down the story I knew I could crank it out relatively quickly.

How many stories have you written?

The spec is the longest piece I have written other than academic writing. I have and continue to write sketches, one-liners, and short films.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

My love for the show and the characters.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Modern Family has an uncanny ability to weave together wonderfully disjointed stories thematically and I did not feel comfortable putting pen to paper until I had that sense of interconnectivity locked down.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Improv comedy. Late night comedy. Comedy. Podcasts about politics and other useless intelligent jargon.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

More than winning (which is pretty great), I wanted feedback. Every time you enter one of these things, it is a total gamble, and I this was the first one I entered because of the promise of feedback in a timely manner. I got solid feedback and was able to tweak my script to a point where I was happy with it, all thanks to the kind people at WILDsound.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Being busy is not an excuse. Make time. Outline the crap out of everything. Start with smaller pieces – success in brevity is absolutely scalable.

****

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Editor: John Johnson

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

WILDsound Performer: KATELYN VANIER

ACTOR KATELYN VANIER

Height: 5’4

Hair: Blond

Eyes: Blue

ACTORFeature Screenplay – CRIME EXTRAORDINAIRE
January 2016 Reading
Written by Howard Fridkin
ACTOR1st Scene -PURGATORY
January 2016 Reading
Written by Alex A. Kecskes

 

ACTOR1st Scene -GUNNISON
January 2016 Reading
Written by Daniel Duane
ACTORShort Screenplay – US NAVY CINE-KODAK
January 2016 Reading
Written by Stephen M. Hunt
ACTORShort Screenplay – THE NEW NEIGHBORS
January 2016 Reading
Written by Filippo Santaniello

 

ACTORMAD MEN “A Hold on Me”
July 2013 Reading
Written by Moneesa Credle

WILDsound Announces its January 2016 Short Screenplay Winners

Watch the 2 Short Screenplay Winners for January 2016.

US NAVY CINE-KODAK
Written by Stephen M. Hunt

SYNOPSIS:

Genres: War, Thriller, Drama

France, 1941; an American undercover war correspondent is overwhelmed by an old woman’s unique and unbelievable response to local, Nazi atrocities.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Holly Sarchfield
DUBIN – Dan Cristofori
TESSIER/BREUGEL – Geoff Mays
WOMAN – Katelyn Vanier

Get to know writer Stephen M. Hunt  

——

THE NEW NEIGHBORS
Written by L. Filippo Santaniello

SYNOPSIS:

Genres: Horror, Thriller

Three friends are screening and selecting short films for a low budget horror film festival when the babysitter from the floor below rings the bell. Something bad has happened and she needs help.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Peter Nelson
VIVIAN – Katelyn Vanier
ZACH – Dan Cristofori
ASHLEY – Holly Sarchfield
ALEX – Geoff Mays
ASIAN BOY – Lorne Hiro

Get to know writer Filippo Santaniello  

Watch the January 2016 Feature Screenplay Winner

CRIME EXTRAORDINAIRE
Written by Howard Fridkin

SYNOPSIS:

Genres: Action, Adventure, Thriller, Crime

For the ultimate revenge, an internationally renowned mystery writer uses his latest novel as a blueprint to steal the Eiffel Tower.
CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Holly Sarchfield
MONIER – Lorne Hiro
LAMADOUR – Peter Nelson
MANDRELL – Dan Cristofori
WORCHEV/FELICE – Geoff Mays
LORRAINE – Katelyn Vanier

Get to know writer Howard Fridkin:

1. What is your screenplay about?

For the ultimate revenge, an eccentric Parisian crime novelist financially persuades the world’s greatest detective, scientist and architect into helping him execute the greatest heist of all-time: stealing the Eiffel Tower.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

It brings back to the cinema a more mature high action/adventure thriller in the tradition of such eventful classics as “The Guns of Navarone,” Where Eagles Dare,” “The Towering Inferno” and Goldfinger,” which were all box office giants. With nothing but Marvel and DC comic book movies flooding the theatres, I thought this would be something challengingly fresh to excite audiences with…in other words, “Mission Impossible meets “Ocean’s eleven.”

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Unprecedented concept.

4. You are the first writer to have ever had three feature screenplays read at our festival. Two of them high concept scripts that the actors LOVED performing. You can’t possibly have more feature screenplays completed….do you?

Unless I’m retiring, there’s always another in the pipeline.

5. What makes this screenplay and your previous script (The Last Adventure of Shay Blaze) stand out from the pack is your ability to mix genres. Crime Extraordinaire can be categorized as a “Crime meets Mystery meets Adventure meets Action, with a little bit of Romance mixed in!” Is mixing so many genres into one completed story a calculated decision in prep?

To help make my mark, I tend to take big risks with extravagant concepts and that usually means fusing different genres together, which I always love experimenting with. But the real trick is to ground them in some basis of reality so your audience will trust you to win them over with an exciting, new approach to your story and not something that eventually turns incredulous.

6. You make it very convincing that the Eiffel Tower could be stolen in your screenplay. Can it really happen? (AKA – Is your engineering and math realistic in the script, or did you make it all up?)

No. I really had to do my homework on this one. I researched ad nauseam all the mechanics of the operation in order to keep things credible. However, for the sake of pure entertainment, some suspension of disbelief is camouflaged by reality based information.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

As a kid, I was always infatuated with two historical landmarks: the Eiffel Tower and the Great Wall of China. One of my favorite films is the original“The Taking of Pelham One Two Three. For some reason its title inspired me to come up with a plot about taking something big, so since I was preoccupied with the Tower, it seemed like a logical choice to marry the two ideas together and see what happens with it in a screenplay. And who knows…maybe one day the Great Wall will be a sequel.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The most demanding challenge, of course, was creating convincing characters that would eliminate the reader’s skepticism that an operation of this magnitude could actually be accomplished, and not to drop the ball in its execution; otherwise, the script would have just been a house of cards.

9. The hero/anti-hero/smartest guy in the room in your story is a writer himself. A man who figures out all the pieces of the complicated puzzle to make this ultimate caper happen. Do you really think the great & successful crime writers have the ability to use their past research in prepping their stories, plus their imagination to pull off something like stealing the Eiffel Tower?

Well, you just can’t go around every day stealing any national monument you want and get away with it. You must become an expert on the subject you’re writing about to be taken seriously. Anything is possible so long as you’re willing to do the homework and back up your imaginative ideas with a set of logical rules to abide by.

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I’ve been extraordinarily lucky with WILDsound’s feedback over the years. It helped me achieve three table reads, which are so important to improve on what I thought was my final draft. You can drive yourself nuts reading your material over and over again, trying to reach perfection. But until you actually hear the dialogue and scene descriptions being read by other voices, sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees. These table reads have helped me catch overlooked errors that I never saw with my own two eyes on the pages.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Giving someone advice is like telling them how to dress. Everyone has their own style (voice) and wardrobe (scripts). Rather than giving advice, I’ll take my own: “I write every screenplay as if it were my last, so it has to be the best.