Film Review: HIGH LIFE (UK/France/Germany/Poland/USA) ****

Festival Reviews

High Life Poster
Trailer
A father and his daughter struggle to survive in deep space where they live in isolation.

Director:

Claire Denis

Claire Denis’s films take on the recurring them of human conflict in different scenarios.  In her first and in my opinion best film CHOCOLAT, Denis looked at what happens to black and whites in a confined space in Africa.  In BEAU TRAVAIL, the foreign legionaries were examined for their actions and behaviours and in her latest, HIGH LIFE, the audience takes a look at astronauts (some of whom are hardened criminals) confined in a spaceship as they interact with each other.

The results of her latest film is a mix between genres, Denis’ style which makes for one of the most intriguing films of the year.  

View original post 418 more words

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Film Review: HIGH LIFE (UK/France/Germany/Poland/USA) ****

Festival Reviews

High Life Poster
Trailer
A father and his daughter struggle to survive in deep space where they live in isolation.

Director:

Claire Denis

Claire Denis’s films take on the recurring them of human conflict in different scenarios.  In her first and in my opinion best film CHOCOLAT, Denis looked at what happens to black and whites in a confined space in Africa.  In BEAU TRAVAIL, the foreign legionaries were examined for their actions and behaviours and in her latest, HIGH LIFE, the audience takes a look at astronauts (some of whom are hardened criminals) confined in a spaceship as they interact with each other.

The results of her latest film is a mix between genres, Denis’ style which makes for one of the most intriguing films of the year.  

View original post 418 more words

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