Tag Archives: Reetu Bambrah

January 2016 Novel Winner: Large is the Smallest We’ve Got by JED HAMILTON

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

Watch Chapter 2 of LARGE IS THE SMALLEST WE GOT. Reading by Reetu Bambrah

Get to know writer Jed Hamilton:

1. What is your novel about?

An unlikely mix of people, thrown together by the LA Earthquake, 1994.
A story of love lost and found…
A story of greed and corruption. ….
A story about a phoney ghost-hunter show… and a dog that looks like a panda.

2. Why should this novel be read by people?

Some people who have read it tell me they go on thinking about it, and even re-read it. It is (ultimately) a very moving tale.
The opening comedy is deceptive

3. How would you describe this novel in two words?

Funny, moving

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

A toss between ‘His Girl Friday’ or ‘The Producers’

5. How long have you been working on this novel?

2 Years

6. Do you have an all-time favorite novel?

Bleak House – no contest.

7. What motivated you to write this novel?

Living in LA for 10 years

8. What artist would you love to have dinner with?

Matt Stone or Trey Parker . If they don’t count as artists, David Hockney

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Playing the piano – and composing. I’ve scored a few movies.

10. What influenced you to enter the Novel Festival?

Having parts of my book read by actors

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Write, write and write
Don’t re-write until you’ve finished the book, or you get bogged down.

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

Advertisements

January 2016 Novel Winner: THE FURLITES OF ARORIEL by Marie J.S. Phillips

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

Watch The Furlites of Aroriel. Reading by Reetu Bambrah

Get to know writer Marie J.S. Phillips:

1. What is your novel about?

This first book in a three book trilogy covers the adventures of the Furlitian Clan Darius before and during the first Furlitian interstellar flight, captained by Commander Geupetus. In family saga style, it follows their suddenly disrupted home life, to the errant flight and encounter with an alien species, humans, and in the end, reveals an important little snippet of Earth life that in the second book blossoms into a great gift(telepathic Felakoons) for Furlitekind, which some do not appreciate right away on their homeworld. In the third book, these creatures prove to be an integral part of how the family solves the problem the Universe dumps on them in Book III:Eyes In The Dark.(in progress) But these treasures do not appear until Book Two: Earth-bred, Matissia-born.(published in 2014)

2. Why should this novel be read by people?

We humans tend to be very egocentric, to the point that we assume any alien life must be humanoid, built like us with only superficial differences. I believe the Furlites and their world sheds light on the possibilities of life evolving and succeeding without any primate ancestry, a what if dinosaurian type life on another world never went extinct. Through their eyes I wish to help humanity look at the big picture and perhaps see itself from outside our egocentric view and maybe learn a thing or two.

3. How would you describe this novel in two words?
Family adventure

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

ET: The extra terrestrial

5. How long have you been working on this novel?

For over 3 decades, since I put the rough draft on paper in late 1979, and the first draft I laid down in 1981. The finished copy was published in 2012.

6. Do you have an all-time favorite novel?

I have several, but one of my favorites, is Far-Seer by Robert Sawyer.

7. What motivated you to write this novel?

Long weird tale, but the Furlites began as fantasy artwork, then appeared in a short illustrated story in a college class in 1976. I have been writing since I learned how to do so at about 5 years old. The impending completion of the third book in this series is still a project in my life.

8. What artist would you love to have dinner with?

Magritte

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love cats, particuularly Maine Coon cats. I also love trees, horses and horseback riding, animals in general, gardening, earth sciences, swimming, and all of these influence my writing in some manner.

10. What influenced you to enter the Novel Festival?

I was invited, and the books need the exposure.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Never give up. Keep writing and persevere. And once you get that story down, proof read, edit, then edit some more, and proof read, edit, repeat, until you finally have that polished manuscript, even if it does take decades.

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

January 2016 Novel Winner: Cheerage Fearage by Kimberly Dana

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

Watch Novel Reading of Cheerage Fearage. Reading by Reetu Bambrah

Buy Book Online:
http://www.amazon.ca/Cheerage-Fearage-Kimberly-Dana-ebook/dp/B007OZH5XO

Get to know writer Kimberly Dana:

1. What is your novel about?

It’s ten years after cheer captain Lexy Mills’ bizarre drowning, but the bloodthirsty pranks are still going down at a hypnotic pace. Urban legend says it’s Lexy seeking revenge, picking off cheerleaders one by one in a symphony of horrors.  Peppered with humor and wit to offset the diabolically scary, CHEERAGE FEARAGE will have teens salivating for more Tiki Tinklemeyer and tales of the sleepy, supernatural town of Valentine. CHEERAGE FEARAGE is the first installment of a paranormal jaw-dropping teen series, jam-packed with chills and thrills that will leave no pimple ungoosed! Fire up as the girls get ready to fly high and die! Ready? O-kay!

2. Why should this novel be read by people?

Teens love chills and thrills, and this novel is no exception.  Think Friday the 13thmeets Bring It On!    

3. How would you describe this novel in two words?

Creepy fun.  

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I love suspenseful thrillers.  

5. How long have you been working on this novel?

I wrote Cheerage Fearage in about twelve months.  

6. Do you have an all-time favorite novel?

My favorite novel is To Kill a Mockingbird.  

7. What motivated you to write this novel?

Competition and drama are a big part of girl world.  I loved the idea of a cheerleading co-captain drowning the captain, who comes back as a vengeful ghost.  Her bloodthirsty motto could only be Fly High and Die!

8. What artist would you love to have dinner with?

Stephen King

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love to cook, write, and read voraciously.  

10. What influenced you to enter the Novel Festival?

The Novel Festival is a fabulous way to showcase your writing.  

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?
Read, read, read.  Write, write, write.  Never quit.

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

January 2016 Novel Winner: The First Ones by Regina Walker

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

Watch THE FIRST ONES Transcript Reading. Performed by Reetu Bambrah

1. What is your novel about?

A lonely, depressed and heartbroken ancient vampire comes across a young girl that is unlike anything he has ever seen. He is curious about her nature and what he eventually finds out about her could endanger the extinction of both humans and vampires.

2. Why should this novel be read by people?

If a person ever went through their life feeling alone, like no one cares for them or that they don’t fit in anywhere in society—this book is for them. The First Onescaters primarily to young ones who are at a time in their life when they are trying to figure out who they are, where they fit in and what they want out of life. It builds hope that we can have a better future and that good deeds bring good Karma.

3. How would you describe this novel in two words?  

Original Concept

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Star Wars, Superman, Star Trek

5. How long have you been working on this novel?  

The novel was finished in 2013,  but I have had three revisions.

6. Do you have an all-time favorite novel? 

The Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King

7. What motivated you to write this novel?

As a kid, I was terrified and fascinated by vampires.  As I got older, I was attracted to them for three reasons: their nature, desire, and loneliness.  Their nature is always looking for love and bonding to their love interest for life.  I wanted this in my own life.  Their desire for blood and difficulty abstaining from it related to my temptations and challenges in life; namely, to remain a loving person in a not so loving world.  Vampires are often outsiders, on the fringe of society. I often felt like I did not fit in as well.   I think these are reasons why people can relate to them.

If I ever wrote a vampire story, it had to be different than what is on television and film. Honestly, nothing is really “new” but you can have an original angle on it.  My angle is not so far out there that you can’t understand it; however, it does blend the lines of good and evil.

8. What artist would you love to have dinner with? 

Stephanie Myers

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Acting, Directing, Producing, and Cosmetology

10. What influenced you to enter the Novel Festival?  

I never like entering because I feel like it’s a lotto, but after I made the top twenty best film and tv idea–I feel different about it. Now I realize  it can aid in getting noticed.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers? Do your homework. Read books on how to write, get grammar software, google how to prepare to write a book. It will go a long way in you not having to revise your book a million times like I did.
 

Submit your Novel to the Festival. Three ways to submit:http://novelwritingfestival.com/

 

Today’s Instagram Photos: Thursday January 7 2016

WATCH JANUARY 2016 Poetry Readings

2015 Poetry Contest – Last Deadline January 15th
Submit a poem that’s about the year 2015 and get it made into a movie.
FREE POETRY CONTEST – Deadline July 12th

Watch the best of January 2015 Poetry Readings performed by actress Reetu Bambrah. Click the images and watch:

 NOT SO AMAZING POEM FOR AN AMAZING GIRL – Poetry Reading by Abhishek Jha  T H E I N T E R N M E N T – Poetry Reading by Melodic Rose.
 Flame – Poetry Reading by Carolyn Hucker  Star Attraction – Poetry Reading by Agata Zema
 On A High – Poetry Reading by Patsy Jawo  The Other Side – Poetry Reading by Patsy Jawo
 Who are we – Poetry Reading by Patsy Jawo  My Joseph, My JAM – Poetry Reading by Poet Adrienne Miranda

 

TV PILOT Sitcom – WASHED UP by Leila Ben Abdallah

Watch the TV PILOT Reading of WASHED UP:

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Matthew Lawrence
LENA – Reetu Bambrah
BARRIE/AMIR – Julian Ford
ADAM – Vince Jerad
CONSTANCE/NADIA – Victoria Murdoch

Get to know writer Leila Ben Abdallah:

1. What is your TV PILOT screenplay about?

Washed-Up is about an Arab-American actress, Lena Hadid, who finds fame as a sexy, three-breasted alien queen on a hit sci-fi show with a devoted cult following. When she leaves the show, she finds herself too typecast to ever work again. Out of money and options, Lena moves home to the suburbs of Washington D.C. to share a condo with her metrosexual Arab father, and her hip-hop producer younger brother. In between running a successful bar, chasing women and picking out a tie, Amir supports Lena as she rebuilds her confidence, while Adam’s success as the most popular hip-hop producer in Washington D.C. inspires her to reinvent her career and her life.

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a TV Show?

My favorite sitcoms are the ones centered around characters who are very different and prone to disagree, but are forced to exist together under some circumstance outside of their control. I like watching funny characters struggle to get along and get by with other characters who are diametrically opposed to them in lifestyle, beliefs, opinions, age, politics…The storyline possibilities feel endless among the Hadid family, and there is another wealth of humor to be mined from the setting of the suburbs. The thing that really ties everything together is how much the Hadid’s love each other despite their differences, and I think this is a story with a lot of heart and a lot of potential for longevity.

3. This Pilot has a lot going for it. It’s part inside the business, part comedy, part family, part social commentary, part family, part romance. How would you describe this story in one sentence?

Lena Hadid, a washed-up actress, loses her job starring as a sexy, three-breasted Alien queen on Spaceship: Neutrino, a popular sci-fi show and is forced to move home to the suburbs to share a bachelor pad-style condo with her metrosexual Arab father and rapper younger brother.

4. What is your all-time favorite TV show?

Arrested Development. It’s just so smart and the jokes are so complex, and the series as a whole is so intricately constructed, that whenever I re-watch the series, I catch jokes that had been set-up several episodes earlier that I never noticed before. And this was before the current trend of binge-watching, so that was risky. It also really epitomizes what I love about sitcoms, that idea of very opposing characters struggling to get along under circumstances outside of their control.

5. This is a very tight, emotionally engaging and fun screenplay. How long have you been working on this TV PILOT?

I have been sitting on the idea for years, but actually writing for about 6 months, and put up a private table reading and later a public reading here in NYC at The People’s Improv Theater.

6. How many stories have you written?

This is my second T.V. pilot, I’m currently working on a third, and I have written and performed two solo-shows, one of those solo-shows I performed in the NY International Fringe Festival last summer, and my first pilot, Eight-Sixed, is available for viewing on my website, http://www.leilaben-abdallah.com.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

The brother and father characters in Washed-Up are loosely based on my own brother and father who actually do share a bachelor-pad style apartment in the suburbs of D.C. Those two are the funniest people I know, plus their relationship is so indicative of the times. It’s taking longer and longer for people of my generation to pass those benchmarks of adulthood that were set by previous generations (financial stability, marriage, kids) so it’s not unusual for fully functioning adults to live with their parents. My brother works, has a car, is a generally responsible adult; his roommate just happens to be his father. On top of that, interpersonally, they really epitomize what I love about sitcoms; they are two very different people, who are stuck together and working to get along. I have known for years that I wanted to write a sitcom about their living situation, but I also knew I wanted to insert a strong female protagonist, and after years of collecting ideas and getting inspired by my own dad and brother, I got the idea for the character of Lena, whose story is entirely fiction, but whose personality is a heightened version of mine (I think Lena is a little more self-important and pretentious than I am…but only a little!) and that is when I sat down and drew out the structure and wrote the dialogue.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The biggest obstacle I faced was how to take this amazing wealth of material I had to draw from (my dad and brother) and make it my own in a piece of fiction. This became easier when I came up with the character of Lena as the center of the story, as everything about her story is fiction. The characters of Amir and Adam are inspired by real people, but it was important to me that they not be verbatim presentations of my real family. In the end, the only thing I directly stole (with their blessing) is their ongoing game of hiding that gigantic teddy bear from each other around their apartment to try to scare the other. Credit where credit is due!

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Improv, teaching, Middle Eastern/North African politics.

I practice and perform improv weekly on a house team (The Duke, Wednesdays at 9pm!) at The People’s Improv Theater here in New York City, and I occasionally teach and coach other improv teams whenever they let me. I recently fell completely in love with teaching, and it totally changed the way I look at improv.

I’m proudly half-Tunisian, and this has a way of creeping into everything I write. My dad always says you can’t understand politics until you understand history and geography, and once I started learning about those things, it opened my eyes to why exactly the region has suffered so much, and it also gives me hope that we will see some progress in my life time. I wish more people would take the time to look beyond what CNN chooses to broadcast, because there are pockets of progress (notably in Tunisia) and a lot of people who are fighting like hell for things like civil rights, freedom and democracy. History and geography has shown me that the ME/NA just has more to overcome in the pursuit of those goals, and I wish we here in the West were exposed more to the successes that have happened than just the same exhausting cycle of beheading, bombing, hijacking, kidnapping, beheading, bombing, hijacking…

If you weren’t sure whether I am passionate about Middle Eastern/North African politics or not, it’s worth mentioning that my original answer to this question was about three paragraphs long!

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I was searching on FilmFreeway for screenwriting festivals and contests, and WILDsound was suggested to me. I love that this festival focuses on feedback, and celebrates the process. I seldom ever consider a piece done, and submitting to contests and festivals can sometimes feel like a big declaration of “FINISHED!” but it’s also important to me as a writer to share my work with the world, so this was a perfect balance between letting it loose, and allowing it to be a work in progress. When I first got word that my script would be included in WILDsound, my initial instinct was to send an email saying, “make sure you do it like this! Make sure you do it like that!”, not out of mistrust of the producers, just out of my own writerly self-doubt that the piece would not be able to speak for itself. In the end, the healthiest thing I could do would be to just let the piece go and trust the story to speak for itself and trust that WILDsound would honor the piece. So few festivals, maybe no other festival, serves writers on so many levels!

I was blown away by the thoughtful and detailed feedback. I really felt that I could incorporate the notes because I got the sense that they really got what I was trying to say. He even referenced Frasier in his notes, which I particularly appreciated as Frasier was one I turned to a lot when I was preparing the structure of Washed-Up as it is also a story of adult children co-habitating with a parent. They even took time to give a few tips on formatting, which I really appreciated.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

If you are writing for the screen, produce your own work. If it’s a piece that is meant to be interpreted by actors, you won’t really know it’s potential or quality until it’s read by actors. I have not yet produced Washed-Up for the screen, but I adapted it and produced it onstage at The People’s Improv Theater, with the flashback sequences filmed in advance and projected between scenes. In the process of doing this, I was able to do a lot of editing, and got really in touch with areas where the story was not coming through clearly enough in the dialogue. I produced my first pilot, Eighty-Sixed, for the screen and it very much affected the way I wrote Washed-Up and helped me learn a lot very quickly about structure, since in production you have to break a script down to a really small level, and build it back up again in post. You will also really get in touch with what you are able to accomplish, and you will be constantly surprised by it. There is a film in Sundance this year that was shot on an iPhone. Everyone seems to have a DSLR these days. You can edit in iMovie, which comes on a Mac and YouTube tutorials will get you out of almost any problem. It’s not impossible; you have more resources at your disposal than you think.

    * * * * *

Deadline: SUBMIT TV PILOT/SPEC Script – Get FULL FEEDBACK. Get script performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsound.ca/tvscreenplaycontest.html

Watch WINNING TV PILOT Screenplay Readings
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/tv_pilot_readings.html

Watch WINNING TV SPEC Screenplay Readings
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/tv_spec_readings.html

READ 100s of testimonials for past submitters –
http://www.wildsound.ca/wildsound_festival_review.html