Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL

Get your script performed at the festival. Full feedback on all entries:

http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback!

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Watch Recent Winning Readings:
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/1st_scene_readings.html

1st Chapter – DISTURBED
March 2015 Reading
Written by Suzanne Wilson
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/disturbed.html

1st Scene – THE SINGING TREE
March 2015 Reading
Written by Marilyn Pesola & Peter Moss
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_singing_tree.html

1st Scene – THE UMPIRE HAS NO BALLS
March 2015 Reading
Written by Debbie Bolsky
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_umpire_has_no_balls.html

1st Scene SCRIPT – LEGRAND
February 2015 Reading
Written by Angelina Carkic
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/1st_scene_readings.html

Advertisements

Deadline March 31st: FEATURE Screenplay Festival

Deadline March 31st: FEATURE Screenplay Festival – Get FULL FEEDBACK. Get script performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsound.ca/screenplaycontest.html

Watch WINNING Screenplay Readings – Watch videos of past winners performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/winning_screenplays.html

READ 100s of testimonials from past submitters –
http://www.wildsound.ca/wildsound_festival_review.html

WATCH recent winning Feature Screenplay Readings:

Feature Script – BESA
March 2015 Reading
Written by Michael Miceli

FEATURE SCRIPT – TO DIE IN TENNESSEE
February 2015 Reading
Written by Verlynn Kneifl & Laurie Larsen

FEATURE SCRIPT: THE FIREWORKS STAND
January 2015 Reading
Written by David M. Hyde

FEATURE SCRIPT – FEATURE: FLEET WEEK: EVANESCENCE
December 2014 Reading
Written by David Redstone

Deadline March 15th: SUBMIT your FEATURE Screenplay to the Writing Festival

Deadline March 15th: SUBMIT your FEATURE Screenplay – Get FULL FEEDBACK. Get script performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsound.ca/screenplaycontest.html

Watch WINNING Screenplay Readings – Watch videos of past winners performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/winning_screenplays.html

READ 100s of testimonials from past submitters –
http://www.wildsound.ca/wildsound_festival_review.html

Watch Recent Winning Feature Screenplay Readings:

Feature Script – BESA
March 2015 Reading
Written by Michael Miceli

FEATURE SCRIPT – TO DIE IN TENNESSEE
February 2015 Reading
Written by Verlynn Kneifl & Laurie Larsen

FEATURE SCRIPT: THE FIREWORKS STAND
January 2015 Reading
Written by David M. Hyde

FEATURE SCRIPT – FEATURE: FLEET WEEK: EVANESCENCE
December 2014 Reading
Written by David Redstone

FEATURE SCRIPT READING – CAHOOTS
November 2014 Reading
Written by Elan Carlson

FEATURE SCRIPT READING – THE FIX FACTORY
October 2014 Reading
Written by Kyle Jenkins

Interview with Michael Miceli, Feature Screenplay Winner (BESA)

WILDsound has a reputation for providing on-the-money professional feedback for each submission. I like to enter every project I do in WILDsound because it is a great barometer for comparing your work to what is hot in the industry.

– Michael Miceli, on the WILDsound experience (review)

    Watch the Winning Feature Script Reading of BESA

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Sedina Fiati
    Gino – Peter Nelson
    Ilir – Roman Spera
    Uke – Jarrid Terrell
    Carmine Jr. – Robert Notman
    Valbona – Erynn Brook
    Valbona – Steve Rizzo

Matthew Toffolo interviews winning writer Michael Miceli:

Matthew: What is your screenplay about?

Besa is the story of a loyal Italian father, forced to defend his son who has inadvertently sparked a New York mob war between Sicilian and Albanian crime families.

Matthew: Why should this script be made into a movie?

Besa is based on the electrifying novel by Louis Romano, who did an incredible job of capturing the criminal world as it exists today. Our version of the mafia is a weak fossil of what has been depicted in films over the past forty years. The real power is in the fresh blood: Albanians and Russians.

Matthew: How long have you been writing stories?

I wrote my first script when I was in second grade. It was for puppet show I put on for my class about a very lucky dog. Before I could write, I used to draw stories, frame by frame, on a piece of paper and then pull the paper past a make shift projector I had made – which was a flashlight aimed through a toilet paper tube, shining onto my bedroom wall. So I guess you could say storytelling and “filmmaking” has been there since the beginning for me.

Matthew: What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I saw “Raiders of the Lost Ark” twice in the theatre when I was 4 years old. The moment that boulder came rolling , I was hooked.

Matthew: What artists would you love to work with?

Working or not, I’d love to be in the same room with Steven Spielberg for an hour with the hope that I’d catch whatever he has. E.T., Jaws, and Schindler’s List are three completely different genres and he mastered them all.

Matthew: How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I have written 13 feature film scripts. Most recently, “Beautiful Me”, a faith-based film being produced by Restoring Truth Media, and “Chimerism”, a medical thriller being produced by Girl On a Rocking Horse Productions. Both are going into production in 2015.

Matthew: Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

On set, anywhere, bringing a script to the screen.

Matthew: Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

Characters first. Once you’ve written everybody’s whole life from birth to the first page of your script, then you’re ready to begin the journey. From there, I don’t try to structure creativity. I write out of order, just tackling any scene as it grows out of my mind. The smoothing out comes in subsequent drafts.

Matthew: Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I have three little kids that seem to be passionate about everything. So I am passionate about them being passionate about everything.

Matthew: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Every writer should always remember the golden rule of screenwriting: simple story, complex characters. If you can do that, you’re more than half way there.

Interview with TOY BOY Director March Mercanti

It’s always nice to hear feedback. I am glad that a lot of the audience saw Jeff as an inspiration to be yourself no matter what others might think of you.

– March Mercanti, on the WILDsound experience.

    WATCH the ‘TOY BOY’ Audience FEEDBACK Video:

Matthew Toffolo interviews Director March Mercanti:

Matthew: What motivated you to make this film?

March: I started following Jeff on twitter about two years ago. His tweets caught my eye because they were either about a new toy purchase or a very stern/hilarious viewpoint on a topic. When I met up with him to discuss general fandom, it developed into myself making a film on Jeff.

Matthew: From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this film?

March: 3 months

Matthew: What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

March: To be honest, Jeff was my biggest obstacle. We laugh about this now. But he was very controlling on how he wanted the film to be represented and what content I was showing. One example, we shot some stuff from his favourite collection, Jurassic Park, and I had to leave it on the cutting room floor in the editing room because it simply didn’t fit in with the other parts of the film. I think he is still mad at me for that. There were numerous other things he didn’t like. But Jeff gained some trust in me after he showed his parents and close friends a cut of the final project. Jeff was vulnerable when it came down to it and I thank him for that. His challenges he gave me were stressful but it helped us see eye to eye in the end of it all.

Matthew: You were at the festival, what was your favourite film that played at the festival besides your own?

March: My Buddy. It was diverse yet it used extremely easy story telling devices.

Matthew: Your subjects were at the festival too. They seem to relish on their 15 minutes of fame. We joked about a sequel. Think it will ever happen?

March: I don’t think Jeff will sell all of his toys any time soon but if he did I would be down to explore the possibilities. Jeff will always be interesting.

Matthew: What is next for you? A new film?

March: I am making my first comedy short film this spring/summer.

Today’s Writing Festival Testimonials

Read testimonials of recent submitted works and their reactions to the feedback they have received from the festival:

Submit your Screenplay or Story (Novel, Short Story) to the festival today for FEEDBACK, plus get it performed at the festival by professional actors: http://www.wildsound.ca

I appreciate you taking the time to give me a good insight into the next steps and tweaking I need to work on.

– Lois Terrans, TV Spec Screenplay (Supernatural)

Thank you so much for this feedback-I have read it and look forward to really making time to consider all these points and suggestions-I appreciate the detail and your staff’s thoughts on improvements..

– Lisa Sniderman, Stage Play (What Dreams Are Made Of)

A note to let you know that I thought your review of “Unconditional Love” was right on. Thanks for the encouragement regarding the basics of the thesis. Also, your comments about the weak points were well make.

– Chet Shupe, Unconditional Love, Short Story
 
 
Thanks for the feedback! Very helpful advice for my next draft.

– Ryan Feldman, Girls, TV Spec Screenplay
 
I just wanted to say THANKS for the feedback. It was very specific, detailed and makes a lot of sense. It helped me to consider a lot of what I hadn’t considered before. I really do appreciate the time you took to prepare this and I feel this was money well-spent. I will continue to work on this and send to you again in the near future. Thanks again.

– Robert People, First Lady, TV Pilot
 
Appreciate the feedback. Thank you for the fast response!

– Cole Folwer, Masters of Sex, TV Spec Screenplay
 
Thank you for the feedback. I will take the notes into consideration for future drafts.

– Genevieve Heineman, SOL, TV PILOT
 
Thank you for the detailed feedback. Whoever did this feedback is a caring person with heart!

– Doris B. Gill, Rembrandt and the Seedlings, Feature Script
 
Thank you for this helpful feedback. I will follow your suggestions.

– Bonnie Toews, Split-Second Start, 1st Scene Script
 
Thanks for your feedback, you don’t know how much it means to me, I agree with you on the points that need to be changed, but I’d like to add that the Kuwaiti family are not going to stay in the series for two long, they are just there for two more episodes that’s all, and the reason why is that Mubarak will be murdered and David Cortiez is his soon, so he goes to Kuwait to investigate what really happened and finds the killer.

– Asim Abraham, Blood Brothers, Feature Script
 
Thank you so much for your critique. I really appreciate it!

– Linda Collison, Looking for Redfeather, Play
 
Many, many thanks to those of you who vetted my book, THE PITS. All its short comings were expertly noted and I have taken your comments and advice on board

– Greg Smith, The Pits, Novel
 
Thanks so much for the feedback, I really appreciate it. I will definitely take this advice and keep improving the script.

– Jason Mageras, Parks and Recreation, TV Spec
 
Thank you so much for your feedback for my story ‘The Killing of Freddie Foster’. That’s a great critique and will definitely makes some changes.

– Kerin Freeman, The Killing of Freddie Foster, Novel
 
Thank you so much for your feedback; it is very appreciated.

– Melody Stewart, Indigo, Feature Screenplay
 
I appreciate the constructive criticism of the reader and the respect for what the play is and not attempting to turn it into something it is not.

– E. Thomalen, Hecuba, Play
 
Thanks so much for your feedback. Excellent notes.

– John Alarid, Kodak Moments, TV PILOT
 
Thank you for the wonderfully insightful feedback. I’m elated to hear Heart of Fire has such potential.

– Brittany Arrington, Heart of Fire, Feature Script
 
First, thank you for your efforts and the interest you have shown. I appreciate your help.

– James Lillie, Fagan’s War, Feature Script
 
Thank you SO, SO, SO much for your feedback. I am not a “writer” by trade, so this was absolutely fantastic to read.

– Lonny Anger, Frank and Bruno, TV PILOT
 
Thanks for the feedback. I’m definitely taking all your notes into consideration. I appreciate every single comment.

– Ruben Diaz, Mystery Road, 1st Scene Screenplay
 
Thank you! I find your comments extremely helpful and I look forward to a re-write and resubmission.

– Taylor Albertson, 29.0, Short Screenplay
 
I must commend you for your brilliant feedback. I’ve received a couple of feedbacks in the past, and have taken care of most story problems that you raised. But no one had pointed out the issues your team raised in the fourth paragraph. Which is right on point. And raises valid questions that need answers.

– Chidi Ezeibieli, Inhuman Nature, 1st Scene Screenplay
 
As usual, totally impressed by, and very appreciative of, the below critique! Thank you so much and I will work on the edits you speak of in my next draft.

– Michael Zamanis, Drive-Thru, Feature Screenplay
 
Many thanks for the feedback, it’s very helpful! I will have another look at it and implement some improvements.

– Virginia Burges, The Virtuoso, Novel
 
Thank you for the very informative feedback. I really appreciate the diverse perspective that was given. Again, thank you.

– Jamison Derfler, God’s Will, Feature Screenplay
 
Awesome feedback! Thank you so much for the time and effort that was put into reading my script and delivering these constructive notes.

– Matt O’Connor, Bad Madison, TV PILOT
 
These notes are extremely helpful. I appreciate the time / effort your team put into it! Will get to work..

– Adam Wright, Treasured Ones, TV PILOT
 
Thank you so much for the very helpful feedback!

– JR, Not Another Vampire Story, Feature Script
 
Thanks very much for the feedback!! It was a bit brutal to read. But thanks again very much!! Now I have a bit more direction and certainly got more than my moneys worth. I’ll use this service again for sure!

– Jeremy Jagusch, Last 30 Days, Feature Script

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL

The communication, organization and feedback these guys offer are fantastic and scriptwriters of all disciplines and experience should be jumping at the service WILDsound provide. The best thing about it is they are as enthusiastic as you about your work. Thank you to everyone involved with WILDsound.

– Grant Reid, on this 1st Scene Screenplay experience (review)

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL Get your works showcased at 2015 festival events.
http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback! At least 30 winners a month.

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Watch February’s 1st Scene Screenplay Winning Readings:

Legrand, 1st Scene Screenplay Reading by Angelina Carkic

Hellcat, 1st Scene Screenplay Reading by Alan Hostetter:

The Curse Of Sam Hain – 1st Scene Script by Jacob F. Keller:

Sparks: 1st Scene Reading by Megan K. Bickel: