Edward Pronley – January 2017 TV Spec (MODERN FAMILY) Screenplay Winner

Watch the January 2017 Winning TV SPEC Screenplay Reading.

Best Scene from the screenplay MODERN FAMILY Screenplay
Written by Edward PronleyCAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sean Ballantyne
CLAIRE – Val Cole
MITCHELL/LUKE – Nick Wicht
GLORIA/ALEX – Shannon McNally
HALEY/LILY – Catherine D’Angelo
PHIL – David Straus
CAMERON/JAY – Charles Gordon

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Family

After refusing to fulfill Claire’s request to hire tree trimmers, Phil, with Luke’s help, takes matters into his own hands; Claire and Mitchell attempt to have a relaxing getaway; Gloria has problems trusting the Dunphys.


How does this screenplay fit into the context of this show?

When the idea for this story came to me, I knew it would be able to fit in nicely with the rest of the series. The conflict that arises from the three separate storylines converge in a way that I have definitely witnessed on the show before.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Trust family.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

I have a problem with continuously re-watching, not only Modern Family, but also How I Met Your Mother. These two shows have great strengths in both writing comedy, and in writing characters we care about. I love seeing that in a comedy and hope to create something similar in my own writing.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I started this screenplay in the Summer of 2016 while pursuing a Screenwriting Certificate from NYU. It took me about the entire summer, with the help of my professor and my fellow classmates, to establish a good first draft. From there it went through many revisions until it was in it’s strongest form by around the end of December.

How many stories have you written?

Although this is my first spec script that I have written, I’ve written and produced a number short films (one that has gone on to be nominated for Best Screenplay at some festivals), I’ve written a feature, and most recently I finished a Two-Act comedy play that will be produced and performed around the end of April.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

Last Summer, before I even thought about writing this spec, I had been helping my father cut down trees around the yard. My mother begged him to hire professionals instead of doing it himself, but he thought it would save time and money. Well, a few days later as I was helping him cut down a rather large tree in our front yard, we miscalculated where it would fall and it ended up crashing into the top of our house. The A story of my script follows, almost exactly, this chain of events. After this occurred during the Summer, I had so many people telling that it would fit very well into an episode of Modern Family, so I decided to bring it to life.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

There were numerous obstacles that I faced when finishing this screenplay. It went through so many changes during my revision process and before even sending it to festivals, there was a point where I basically scrapped half of it and started over. The reason for this was due to the three complex storylines that intertwine throughout the script. I knew where I wanted them to go and how I wanted it all to end, however, it was getting them all to that point that had me scratching my head and scrapping rewrite after rewrite. In the end though, I feel that it came together very nicely.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I really enjoy doing anything that has to do with music. I play a number of instruments, including guitar and a little bit of piano, but I have recently got into the habit of trying to learn even more instruments. Most recently, I have picked up the drums and the trumpet.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Initially the biggest thing that made me want to enter this festival was the recorded performance of our written scripts if we were to win. After receiving my notes from the festival though, I would say that I now have two big reasons to submit to this festival again in the future. The notes I received were very well thought out and helped me immensely during my most recent revision of the script. The festival put a lot of effort into making the notes as thorough and helpful as possible.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

The best advice I could give other writers would be to power through. There are times where you might think that you need to take a break from your writing and step back, maybe giving yourself an hour or a week to think about the story and your characters before you continue. I know in my experience though, that an hour turns into five and a week can turn into a month. If you sit down and write out your story, no matter how terrible it might seem to you, just know that the revision will always be better. Revisions can’t happen though, unless you actually write the script.

****
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

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Screenplay CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or FEATURE Script
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Dimitry Pompée – January 2017 TV PILOT Screenplay Winner

Watch the January 2017 Winning TV PILOT Screenplay.

Best Scene from the screenplay DOWN WITH THE BUREAUCRACY Screenplay
Written by Dimitry PompeeCAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sean Ballantyne
NATHAN – Gabriel Darku
KAREN/PAULA – Val Cole
LUKE – Nick Wicht
MYLES – Charles Gordon
ALLIE/NORA – Shannon McNally
QUINN – Catherine D’Angelo
BARLOWE – David Straus

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Political

After being framed for treason and losing his job at a prestigious DC lobbying firm, an arrogant grad student finds himself forced to take an entry-level position at the second-worst federal agency in America.

Get to know the writer:

What is your TV Pilot screenplay about?

My pilot, Down With The Bureaucracy, is about an arrogant graduate student named Nathan who is forced to take an entry-level position at the second-worst federal agency in America in order to keep his academic scholarship. While Nathan is hostile to all of his coworkers at first, he finds he must convince them to help him save his job when his spiteful manager tries to fire him on the first day.

Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

Aside from the fact that I think it would be a pretty funny show, I think there’s a huge audience for a sitcom about how ridiculous it can be working at the lower rungs of the federal government. We certainly have some amazing shows like Veep that mock the people in the corridors of power, but there are plenty of people in the lesser-known agencies who could use the same treatment.

At the same time, I also want to create a show that demonstrates the good that the federal workforce can do. Not only could this show derive material from the incompetence of the federal bureaucracy, it can show that there are plenty of talented and dedicated federal employees who are keeping this country afloat. I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of a better way to endear people to their government than through a show about a group of bumbling coworkers who occasionally manage to do a decent job. Well, aside from a civics class.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Utterly rewarding.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

It’s only rounding out its second season, but I think I’ve watched every episode of NBC’s Superstore about seventeen times each. It’s an excellent example of how to use an ensemble cast full of absurd characters to create a compelling and hilarious sitcom. The same can be said of The Good Place, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Community, Parks and Rec, 30 Rock, and all the other shows I find myself watching again and again.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’ve been working on this one for about two years and a half now. I recently compared the first draft from May 2014 with this current draft, and while many of the core pieces remain intact, it is radically different than it used to be. Hopefully, it’s better too!

How many stories have you written?

This is a difficult question to answer, because I have several scripts in various stages of “completion.” I would say that I have four scripts in what you might call late-stage drafts, and many others that are in earlier stages of editing, drafting, outlining, or nascent, amorphous chaos.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

When I was in grad school, I was also working full-time and I was very unhappy with my employment situation. I was bored and frustrated, and all of my job applications were met with silence, so I felt like I was stuck. I can’t even remember what the situation was, but one day, some nonsense happened at work and I said something to the effect of, “That is so stupid, it could be in a sitcom.” I started writing that very night. And I did end up leaving that job for something much better soon after, but not before taking extensive notes about working there that I’ve used in my pilot.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I don’t believe it’s done yet, but there have been some obstacles in getting it to this point. The most vexing obstacle for me was and remains developing a consistent writing habit, then sticking to it. I try do some writing during lunch at work, and then after coming home and foraging through the fridge for a somewhat healthy dinner, I write some more. Some days are better than others, but I figure as long as I can get SOMETHING down every day, I can count it as a success.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Video games, a free and open internet, and naps. Pretty much anything I can do on my couch.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I entered the festival precisely because of the reputation of the feedback. It can be challenging to find sources for insightful feedback when you’re outside of an academic or professional setting, especially if you’re just starting out and you have no connections. Several friends of mine who had previously entered the festival told me that the feedback they received was incredibly helpful, and I absolutely agree. After digesting and utilizing the notes I received, I can say with utmost certainty that my script is leagues ahead of where it was before the festival.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Many people have said this in much more insightful ways, but I’d advise other writers to always be open to receiving constructive feedback, and to seek it out specifically. It’s not easy hearing something you’ve been working on for a long time isn’t as good as you think it is, but receiving that type of criticism is essential to developing your skills as a writer. Don’t take it personally, don’t ignore it, and use it to improve your work.

****
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson


TV CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or TV SPEC Script
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Screenplay CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or FEATURE Script
FULL FEEDBACK on all entries. Get your script performed
Screenplay CONTESTFIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) Screenplay CONTEST
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Erica Barfield Peterson – December 2016 TV Screenplay Winner

THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MIDLIFE CRISIS TV Pilot
Written by Erica Peterson
Read 10 Questions with the writerCAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Michelle Alexander
MARK – Ucal Shillingford
LEATHERFACE – Noah Casey
JANICE/ALEXIS – Angela Cavallin
MADISON/CHRISSY – Dana Thody
PHARMACIST – Sean Ballantyne
BETT – Chris Reid Geisler

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Horror

On his 40th birthday, Leatherface has decided it’s time to “find his truth,” so he reaches out to the one person who can help him… his only victim that got away.

Get to know the winning writer:

1. What is your screenplay about?

It’s the story of Leatherface (from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre) turning 40 and realizing the life he’s been living may not be the life he wants. Maybe he doesn’t want to hack people to death. Maybe he doesn’t want to eat people at every meal. Maybe he loves candle making but will never know until he goes on a journey to find his truth, and the only way he knows how to do that is with the aid of his one victim who got away – Mark. Mark survived, lived to tell the tale and even wrote a book about how he learned to live his truth because of what he went through. It’s an Odd Couple story in which both Mark and Leatherface realize how much they can truly help each other find their truths.

2. How does this episode fit into the context of the series?

I think it makes a great buddy comedy. You have two people trying to figure out how they want to live their lives and can only do so with the help of the other. One being a semi-successful self-help author and the other is a murderous psychopath. Each episode the two characters can have new goals of things they either will or won’t want as a part of their new lives. Leatherface has never dated before, never driven — basically never done much other than kill people, so there’s definitely an engine for plenty of stories. Mark is scared of life and wants to learn how to live it to the fullest which is also a great engine for many stories. I think it’s something we’ve never seen before in terms of pairing comedy and horror in the odd couple sense for a TV series.

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Delightfully Psycho.

4. What TV show do you watch over and over again?

Arrested Development is by far my favorite. That and anything that profiles serial killers.

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I worked on this particular pilot for three months.

6. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written 10 specs and 7 pilots.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I’m obsessed with the genre blend of horror and comedy. I had just seen “What We Do In The Shadows” and was like, “That’s what I want to do!” I kind of knew that all along because my favorite movie is “Young Frankenstein,” and I adore “Shaun of the Dead” but it just clicked that day, and I knew I had found my niche. I’m also so fascinated by Leatherface because we never hear him speak and I always wondered — would his life be different if he was taken in by a more “normal” family. Does he ever want to tell his mama to shove off cause he just wants to listen to music or kiss a girl? — so I wanted to explore the question of what would he be like if he came to that realization himself.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

None, really. This was one of those times where I loved every moment of writing this because it’s something I am passionate about so it made it fun. I couldn’t wait to finish to get feedback and make it better and better.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love to dance (was a semi-professional football cheerleader — will not tell you the team name because there are embarrassing photos out there), animals, fighting for the rights of others, making people laugh, sleep and donuts (GOD I LOVE DONUTS).

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I wanted to see what people thought of my script. Sometimes you give your writing to people and worry that they’re just being nice because they know you — with this — you didn’t have to be nice, and you were wonderful! The feedback was great and encouraging. Now I just gotta get those rights from Tobe Hooper!

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Just keep writing and always write. Write what you’re passionate about – not what you think other people want to read. Read scripts – lots of them. Nail down structure and story — if you can get those two things done well then the rest is a piece of cake. Also, forget doubting yourself. You’re not here to please anyone but yourself. If you’re writing to make money and wouldn’t write if you couldn’t make money — maybe you shouldn’t be a writer. And always be willing to take feedback — especially if you get the same note from several people. The goal is to get better and not think that you are already the best.

***

Producer/Director: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson


TV CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or TV SPEC Script
Voted #1 TV Contest in North America.
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or FEATURE Script
FULL FEEDBACK on all entries. Get your script performed
SCREENPLAY CONTESTFIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY CONTEST
Submit the first stages of your film and get full feedback!

Watch the 2016 TV PILOT Winners from the WILDsound Screenplay Festival (18)

Since we started performing TV PILOT screenplays at the festival in 2008, the industry of developing pilots has changed dramatically. There are now 100s of more television shows being created a year because of the large growth of web platforms like Netflix. To add to that, there are now more television stations desperate for solid content looking for that next great television show.

We performed 18 original television pilots in 2016 and are eyeing to perform at least twice as many in 2017.

Deadline for Television Pilot/Spec Screenplay Festival: https://tvfestival.org/

ACTORTV PILOT – MIDLIFE CRISIS
December 2016 Reading
Written by Erica Barfield Peterson
ACTORTV PILOT BEST Scene Screenplay – ARMS OF MORPHEUS
November 2016 Reading
Written by John Christopher Thomas
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay: WILLOWWOOD
October 2016 Reading
Written by Christopher Locke
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay: EMMETT IN PEOPLELAND
October 2016 Reading
Written by Larry Hankin
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay: THE VISA
October 2016 Reading
Written by Conrad Haynes
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – OYMPUS RISING
September 2016 Reading
Written by C M Landrus
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – DIGITAL NATIVES
August 2016 Reading
Written by Adam Preston
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – SURVEILLANCE
August 2016 Reading
Written by Chris Gebhardt & Jenn Russi
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – THE SPECTRAL CITY
July 2016 Reading
Written by Arthur Vincie
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – WILD MAGIC
June 2016 Reading
Written by Julie Nichols
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – CIVILIAN
June 2016 Reading
Written by Gina Scanlon
ACTORFAN FICTION Screenplay – SPACE 2099 (based on Space 1999)
June 2016 Reading
Written by Kevin D Story
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – THE REAPER: REBELLION “AFTERLIFE”
May 2016 Reading
Written by Mark S. MacDonald, Darsey Meredith
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – SMITHEREENS
May 2016 Reading
Written by Hershel D. Rephun
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – MAILROOMIES
April 2016 Reading
Written by Jacques Edeline
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – REC’D
March 2016 Reading
Written by Chris Courtney Martin
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – MINDWALKER
February 2016 Reading
Written by Thorsten Loos
ACTORTV PILOT – LACIE BIDWELL
January 2016 Reading
Written by Jameel Khan
ACTORTV PILOT – LIFE IN THE FAST LANE
January 2016 Reading
Written by Debi Calabro

***

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Editor: John Johnson

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Watch the October 2016 Winning Fantasy/Comedy TV Pilot Reading

THE VISA TV Pilot
Written by Conrad Haynes

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Animated Comedy

A goofball prince and a determined refugee team up to steal coveted travel visas out of their Kingdom and into New America.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Erynn Brook
LEA – Viktoria Napoleonova
KHAN – Michael Lake
STEPHAN – Martin Huss
PRINCE – Brogan Caulfield
QUEEN – Michelle Alexander

Get to know the winning writer:

What is your TV series about?

Khan realizes being in line for the throne totally sucks, so he tries to escape to New America with his friend Lea, but first they’ll need a visa.

OR

A goofball prince and his best friend team up to steal coveted visas out of their kingdom and into New America!

Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

The Visa creates an engaging, original world that feels unlike anything I’ve ever seen before, the characters have a charming and hilarious friendship, and the story lays foundation for an interesting and enticing adventure.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Unlikely Friendship

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

I am addicted to Mr. Robot, Archer, and BoJack Horseman!

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Too long haha.

How many stories have you written?

I’ve written several short films and a few comedy pilots.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

The Visa, at its inception, was written to be a reflection of my life experiences. I take elements from the racial climate in America, my relationship with ornery family members and bizarre friends, my obsession over pop culture, films, and irrelevant ‘macguffins’. They all influenced me in the creations of these engaging characters and fish out of water storyline. Also, I’m a huge animation fan!

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The biggest obstacle I faced was finding the right balance between world building and character development. As the pilot takes place in a futuristic world with sea monsters, cellphones, and wizards, it wasn’t always the best to just drop the audience in mid-story. I had to work to build the characters and world first, and then let the story take over.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I have a passion for working at the intersection of art, technology, and storytelling! I act and I’m actually producing my first short film this month about ‘anxiety’ entitled HeadSpace.

I also really enjoy traveling and meeting new people, hearing their stories. I’m working to visit every state in America within the next year!

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I entered this festival because I love comedy and really enjoyed the idea of having my script performed by actors. Hearing my words come alive on screen definitely beats me creating terrible voices for all of the characters haha.

The initial feedback I received was extremely helpful in sharpening my scenes. The notes from this festival helped me to tighten my script and strengthen my ‘unique’ humor.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Write what makes you laugh. Chances are, it will make others laugh too.

***

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

Watch the October 2016 Winning Adventure/Comedy TV Pilot Reading

EMMETT IN PEOPLELAND TV Pilot
Written by Larry Hankin

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Crime, Mystery, Adventure, Comedy

A Crime Comedy: A Homeless Gentleman in Venice, CA, sets out to help a friend accused of stealing a diamond ring, only to become the prime suspect in the theft.

NARRATOR – Sean Ballantyne
EMMETT – Hugh Ritchie
RUSTY – Cass Van Wyck
MRS. B – Becky Shrimpton
CARMELA – Jane Smythe
OFFICER BUDD – Paul Whitaker
OFFICER LEW – Percy Alexander Harris
EDDIE/ROBBIE – Benjamin Camenzuli

Get to know the winning writer:

What is your TV series about?

It’s about how it’s possible to build your dream with just what you got inside and what’s available outside, but emotions and other people don’t work like that.

Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

3 reasons: A. Because it’s got a particular voice not out there. “Emmett”, the central character, is eccentric, homeless, and believes he’d make a great detective: a combination which allows him to use his eccentric “Illogic” and guilelessness to screw-up the “Logic” and Injustices of The Powerful, The Greedy, The Dishonest, and The Bullies that dare prey on the people who live in Emmett’s neighborhood: The Boardwalk, Beach, Alleyways, and Canals of Venice, California.

B. Basically, the hero – Emmett Sagittarius Deemus – sees himself, not as “a homeless window washer”, but as, “A Homeless Detective” – a Contributor to his Community. His enemies are Chance, Bad People, and Logic: a unique viewpoint for a TV show. “Sanford & Son” gave A Sly Old Junkman a voice. I think it’s time to give A Homeless Detective A Voice.

C. The “Columbo-type” detective structure (“Who dunit?” or “How did they do it?”) is needed for the particular solving-a-puzzle-or-crime narrative because you need time to get the audience involved in wondering “Who” or “How” along with Emmett. Plus: Columbo looked like he could have been homeless. Emmett just takes it there.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Very Funny.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

Seinfeld

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Screenplay (Teleplay) – 3 months. The character,”Emmett Sagittarius Deemus”, that the screenplay’s about: eight years.

How many stories have you written?

Around 30 – from 2 minutes to 20 minutes. All about Emmett.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I wanted to understand the problems and gifts of the longer form narrative. The main gift was, I was able go more deeply into Emmett and what makes him tick.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Anything that stops me from getting it done- finito, typo’s and all; finding the time; making the time, protecting the time once I found it, and showing up regularly & constantly at the keyboard till it’s really ready. There’s no way around “Grit”.
Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Making films from the things I write with friends and others of like mind. Being outside riding my bike and not typing.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Simple synchronicity. I’d just finished it and wanted feedback. I gave it to a friend who read it and liked it and the same day I got an email saying you had a contest that gave feedback – so I entered. When it came, I got the sense the reader “got” the story. And I agreed with the feedback and notes. I thought making the changes would make it better. Easier to read. More direct. Cut two characters. I made the changes and it made it better. Cool.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

What I’ve been told seems to work: Read good screenplays in your genre or field. Write until you find your voice. Copy till it you get original. Be original. Writing a good, solid, finished screenplay is hard but finding an agent might be harder.

****

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editing: John Johnson

September 2016 – Read the best of NEW TV PILOT Loglines:

SUBMIT your TV PILOT or TV SPEC Script
Voted #1 TV Contest in North America.

Read the best of NEW TV PILOT Loglines: 

LAWS OF PROTECTION, by Caretta Neal
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/laws_of_protection_by_caretta_neal.html

PLAY OF LIFE, by Lana Sokolaj
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/play_of_life_by_lana_sokolaj.html

LIFE GETS BETTER TODAY, by Russ Comber
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/life_gets_better_today_by_russ_comber.html

SIN EATER, by Nader Hobballah
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/sin_eater_by_nader_hobballah.html

FORBIDDEN SECRETS, by Salena O’Neal
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/forbidden_secrets_by_salena_oneal.html

SUPERHEROIN, by Brian Du
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/superheroin_by_brian_du.html

BILLOW 1, by Vashaun Baker
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/billow_1_by_vashaun_baker.html

ODD JOBS, by Brie Eley
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/odd_jobs_by_brie_eley.html

SHAMAM OF THE NORTH, by Tamuna Tsertsvadze
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/shaman_of_the_north_by_tamuna_tsertsvadze.html

THIS AIN’T THE DMV, by Karla Ilic
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/this_aint_the_dmv_by_karla_ilic.html

SON OF A PREACHER MAN, by Brandon Edwards
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/son_of_a_preacher_man_by_brandon_edwards.html