Tag Archives: david redstone

Interview with David Redstone, Best Scene (Fleet Week: Neather Rise)

    Watch the Best Scene Reading of FLEET WEEK: NEATHER RISE:

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Stephanie Seaton
    Faxton – Scott Dion Brown
    Lisette – Angelica Alejandro
    Vellario – Derek Chan

Interview with David Redstone:

1. What is your screenplay about?

FLEET WEEK: ‘NEATHER RISE is a sequel to the first FLEET WEEK: EVANESCENCE script – which was adapted from my novel of the same name. ‘Neathers are introduced in that first story as undersea electromagnetic entities (Topsiders call them ghosts). All of the ‘Neathers are victims of warship sinkings during World War Two. This second script expands upon the plight of ‘Neathers in their struggle to exist on a changing Earth, the desperate actions upon which they embark to survive, to proliferate – and their efforts to overcome Topsider plans for eliminating them.

2. Why should this script be made into a movie?

This is an original, fast-paced action adventure that puts a new twist on the concept of ghosts. It’s also open-ended as a series of motion pictures; a potential franchise. There’s depth to the main characters, lots of back-and-forth moral conflict, and much of it within themselves. There are corollaries to current events (both natural and manmade). Ultimately though, a movie should be a very entertaining romp, and I think this script passes muster.

3. What is the theme of Fleet Week?

The main theme is second-chance opportunity. Redemption and obsession are sub-themes.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I think it’s a tie between the original Star Wars and The Wizard of Oz. Logical perhaps, because so many parallels exist between Oz and that first Star Wars film.

5. What artists would you love to work with?

As far as well-known directors, the usual suspects: Eastwood, Lucas, Spielberg, Cameron, Peter Jackson. Yet I admire the diverse talents of so many in the film world. I’d be honored to work with any of those who excel within the multiple phases of cinematic storytelling.

6. How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I’ve done 2 novels and 5 screenplays.

7. Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

Writing and/or directing feature films, and authoring more novels.

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I envision a long-form drama project as building a rail system:

1. The track is the Plot.
2. Stations and terminals are Locations/Settings.
3. Train cars are Characters. Main characters are engines, followed by boxcars of varying sizes, according to the weight of each character’s role.

Plot ideas arrive in various ways. I’ll poke around on the Internet within historical periods, searching for fascinating items which may not yet have been fully explored. Other times I’ll write within a genre that interests me greatly, such as crime drama.

I get a general idea of each character’s mindset before I write, and then alter them to fit once the actual writing begins. At some point your characters speak to you because you know them. You comprehend how they think.

Prior to writing a single word of the actual drama, I conduct thorough research into aspects of the project. The buck stops with me as the storyteller, initially anyway. So, I amass more than enough background information beforehand. I feel it’s a major responsibility to not let the audience lose track, or begin to question anything during their suspension of disbelief.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Family and friends, of course, top the list. I’m also passionate about certain social/environmental/political issues. I am somewhat of a film buff. I’m very passionate about computers and especially software development. That’s been my day job.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival?

For unproduced writers, the real frustration after keystroking “The End” is trying to get noticed. There are so few outlets available for presenting your material. WILDsound appeals to me because my work now migrates from an unread concept into a produced staging, easily accessible by industry pros.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

I believe the first priority for storytellers is to be absolutely fascinated with people. What they do, how they do it. What they say. What drives them, what are their fears, doubts, strengths and weaknesses. Whether a story is character-based or plot-driven, even if it involves talking animals or aliens – it’s still always about people, and how an audience relates to them.

Solid research is vital when writing anything, including fiction. You are the authoritative voice behind the words. If your characters as storytellers don’t pitch it credibly? The audience will pick up on it right away and then you’re sunk, Sunk, SUNK. There are no shortcuts to a well-researched piece of writing.

For newer writers: You’re going to get better as long as you keep at it. Act upon those critical points of feedback from others whose opinions you value. Eventually your style will emerge and you’ll fly on your own.

THRILLER/SUSPENSE Stories from the Writing and Film Festival

WILDsound’s feedback and one-on-one communication got my work to where I felt it was contest worthy.

– Kevin Gebhard, Screenwriter WEECHO (Action/Thriller)

Watch winning stories and movies showcased at the Writing and Film Festival in this genre: Short, Feature, TV Screenplays. Short Stories. Novels. Stage Plays. Poems. Stories from festival made into movies.
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/thriller_stories.html

Submit your writing or film to the festival today:
http://www.wildsound.ca

    Watch the best of Film and Writing from the WILDsound Festival:

Learn more about selection stories showcased at the festival in the THRILLER/SUSPENSE Genre:

1ST SCENE SCRIPT – THE OTHER SIDE
March 2014 Reading
Written by Barb Markusa
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_other_side.html

“Restaurant Con Job Scene” from
September 2014 Reading
Written by Ernest Baver
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/restaurant_con_job_scene.html

SHORT STORY READING – STRANGE THINGS HAPPEN IN NEVADA
September 2014 Reading
Written by Katarzyna Kochany
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/strange_things_happen_in_nevada.html

FEATURE SCRIPT – FEATURE: FLEET WEEK: EVANESCENCE
December 2014 Reading
Written by David Redstone
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/fleet_week_evanescence.html

CHAPTER NOVEL – Rabbit’s Man
February 2014 Reading
Written by Philip Oyok
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/rabbits_man.html

FEATURE SCRIPT READING – THE FIX FACTORY
October 2014 Reading
Written by Kyle Jenkins
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/fix_factory.html

SHORT SCRIPT – DOUBLE CROSS
November 2014 Reading
Written by Cat Stewart & Stephen Hoover
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/double_cross.html

FAMILIAR
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK
Horror, Canada
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/familiar.html

STALLED
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK
Canada, Thriller
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/stalled.html

Feature Screenplay Winning Readings 2014

WILDsound is a screenwriter’s treasure! They take enormous time to provide the most expert, detailed feedback, even allowing my choice to incorporate all the Committee’s ideas or stay with my draft. With caring support, they’ve honored each deadline and every award they promised, and I’m forever grateful for their industry professional’s right-on insightful niggles to enhance my story. Matthew Toffolo and WILDsound provide everything a screenwriter needs to find the way to a story’s successful completion. I’m forever grateful!

– Writing Elan Carlson on the WILDsound Screenplay Festival (Review)

What a diverse and interesting year for the feature scripts we performed in 2014. In total, we had 8 readings of entire screenplays performed by professional actors. And in 2015, WILDsound will perform at least 15 feature screenplay readings.

    Watch the FEATURE SCREENPLAY Readings from the WILDsound Writing Festival

Here are the 2014 Feature Script Winners:

FLEET WEEK: EVANESCENCE
December 2014 Reading
Written by David Redstone

CAHOOTS
November 2014 Reading
Written by Elan Carlson

THE FIX FACTORY
October 2014 Reading
Written by Kyle Jenkins

SHOOTING STAR
September 2014 Reading
Written by Richard Harrison

SHAPESHIFTERS
June 2014 Reading
Written by Andrew Fisk

THE DEVIL’S LARCENY
May 2014 Reading
Written by Howard Fridkin

HOPE IS NOT A BLACK & WHITE RAINBOW
March 2014 Reading
Written by Harold L. Brown

RUM HOUSE
January 2014 Reading
Written by Michael Sieve

Watch all the feature scripts performed at the festival:

http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/feature_script_readings.html

Submit your own feature script to the festival and get it performed. FULL FEEDBACK on all entries:

http://www.wildsound.ca/screenplaycontest.html

David Redstone Winning Feature Screenplay – Fleet Week: Evanscence

For unproduced writers, the real frustration after keystroking “The End” is trying to get noticed.  There are so few outlets to present your material.  WILDsound appeals to me because my work now migrates from an unread concept into a produced staging, easily accessible by industry pros.

 – David Redstone, on the WILDsound Screenplay Festival (Review)

Based on David Redstone’s Sci-Fi/Drama novel, FLEET WEEK: EVANSCENCE is the December 2014 WILDsound Feature Screenplay Winner.

    Watch the Full Winning Reading Here:

    SYNOPSIS:

    A Navy ex-SEAL goes independently active to rescue his kidnapped niece from the ghostly world of undersea ‘Neathers’.

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Becky Shrimpton
    KRYSTEL JANELLI – Erin Boyes
    TOM GILMORE – Julian Ford
    DEREK GARNET – Andy Bridge
    CAPTAIN BERTREL – Chris Huron
    RAY KELVIN – Aaron Rothermund
    VARIOUS PEOPLE – Frances Townend

Q&A with writer David Redstone:

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Fleet Week reveals the initial clash between our world of Topsiders and an undersea world of ‘Neathers. The crews of certain warships sunk during World War II became rejuvenated as oceanic ghosts. They existed in isolation for decades – their minds imprisoned by horrifying images of their own violent deaths and that of their shipmates. Advancing technology finally gives ‘Neathers brief windows of time to go topside and enjoy some of the good things in life that had been denied them. This first story in the Fleet Week saga centers around an obsessed ‘Neather captain bent on revenge and retribution, rather than pleasure-seeking. His target is a young woman related to the demise of his ship and crew.

MT: Why should this script be made into a movie?

I believe that a movie can only succeed if it grabs viewers and keeps them riveted throughout. Therefore, both plot and pace set by a film are critical. I think the storytellers are most essential: Viewers must become fully engaged with the people involved. That’s why some films reach the nirvana of repeat-watching. It’s not so much a film’s plot or pace that convinces a viewer to see it again and again. It’s fascination with the characters inside that very unique world. My hope is that the Fleet Week script displays these elements with enough clarity to be easily recognized by film producers.

MT: What is the theme of Fleet Week?

The main theme is second-chance opportunity. Redemption and obsession are sub-themes.

MT: What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I think it’s a tie between the original Star Wars and The Wizard of Oz. Logical perhaps, because so many parallels exist between Oz and that first Star Wars film.

MT: What artists would you love to work with?

As far as well-known directors, the usual suspects: Eastwood, Lucas, Spielberg, Cameron, Peter Jackson. Yet I admire the diverse talents of so many in the film world. I’d be honored to work with any of those who excel within the multiple phases of cinematic storytelling.

MT: How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I’ve done 2 novels and 5 screenplays.

MT: Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

Writing and/or directing feature films, and authoring more novels.

MT: Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I envision a long-form drama project as building a rail system:

1. The track is the Plot.
2. Stations and terminals are Locations/Settings.
3. Train cars are Characters. Main characters are engines, followed by boxcars of varying sizes, according to the weight of each character’s role.

Plot ideas arrive in various ways. I’ll poke around on the Internet within historical periods, searching for fascinating items which may not yet have been fully explored. Other times I’ll write within a genre that interests me greatly, such as crime drama.

I get a general idea of each character’s mindset before I write, and then alter them to fit once the actual writing begins. At some point your characters speak to you because you know them. You comprehend how they think.

Prior to writing a single word of the actual drama, I conduct thorough research into aspects of the project. The buck stops with me as the storyteller, initially anyway. So, I amass more than enough background information beforehand. I feel it’s a major responsibility to not let the audience lose track, or begin to question anything during their suspension of disbelief.

MT: Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Family and friends, of course, top the list. I’m also passionate about certain social/environmental/political issues. I am somewhat of a film buff. I’m very passionate about computers and especially software development. That’s been my day job.

MT: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

I believe the first priority for storytellers is to be absolutely fascinated with people. What they do, how they do it. What they say. What drives them, what are their fears, doubts, strengths and weaknesses. Whether a story is character-based or plot-driven, even if it involves talking animals or aliens – it’s still always about people, and how an audience relates to them.

Solid research is vital when writing anything, including fiction. You are the authoritative voice behind the words. If your characters as storytellers don’t pitch it credibly? The audience will pick up on it right away and then you’re sunk, Sunk, SUNK. There are no shortcuts to a well-researched piece of writing.

For newer writers: You’re going to get better as long as you keep at it. Act upon those critical points of feedback from others whose opinions you value. Eventually your style will emerge and you’ll fly on your own.

Matthew Toffolo, Interviewer BIO

Matthew Toffolo is the current CEO of the WILDsound Film and Writing Festival. He had worked for the organization since its inception in 2007 serving as the Short Film Festival’s moderator during the Audience Feedback sessions.

Filmmaker of over 20 short films and TV episodes. Took over full reins of the WILDsound Festival in May 2013. From then to the end of 2014, he’s presented over 90 movies at the monthly FEEDBACK Film Festival in Toronto, plus has had over 60 screenplays and stories performed by professional actors at the bi-monthly Writing Festival.

Go to http://www.wildsound.ca and submit your film, script, or story to the festival.

Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com and watch recent and past winning writing festival readings.