Tag Archives: Sue Walker

Watch the Top 10 Poetry Movies from 2015 (so far)

Submit your own poem today and get it made into a movie for a low price. Movies garner 1000s of views online and played at film festivals around the world: http://www.wildsound.ca/poetrycontest.html

TOP 10 Poetry Movies so far in 2015:

#10: Watch “HAMMER” by Cassandra Swan
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-10-watch-hammer/

#9: Watch “ADDICTION Says….” by Lorelie Rozzano
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-9-watch-addiction-says/

#8: Watch “Old Hat” by Sue Walker
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-8-watch-old-hat/

#7: Watch “Adieu, Adios & Farewell” by Albert Russo
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-7-watch-adieu-adios-farewell/

#6: Watch “I NEED to Get High” by Lorelie Rozzano
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-6-watch-i-need-to-get-high/

#5: Watch “Tomorrow is a Crunch” by Asya L. Shmaryan
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-5-watch-tomorrow-is-a-crunch/

#4: Watch “First Kiss” by Lilliana Rose
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-4-watch-first-kiss/

#3: Watch “The Little Book of Mystic Poetry” by Veer Kumar Singh
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-3-watch-the-little-book-of-mystic-poetry/

#2: Watch “Coming to Syracuse” by Rollan McCleary
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-2-watch-coming-to-syracuse/

#1: Watch “I Am the Imaginary Tree of Light” by Ninon de Vere De Rosa
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/07/25/poetry-movie-day-poem-1-watch-i-am-the-imaginary-tree-of-light/


WATCH POETRY MOVIES (see what we can do when you submit):

Poetry Movie Day – POEM #8: Watch “Old Hat”

Today we’re showing our Top 10 of the best of Poetry we’ve turned into a movie from the festival.

Watch Poetry turned into a movie. Turn your own poem into a movie today. Go to http://www.wildsound.ca/poetrycontest.html

Watch Old Hat, Poetry Movie by Sue Walker:

Read about the meaning behind the poem from the poet Sue Walker:
https://wildsoundfestivalreview.com/2015/05/13/watch-poem-turned-into-a-movie-old-hat-by-sue-walker/

Poetry Narration by the Author

Visual Design by Yujin Song

Produced by Matthew Toffolo

Watch Poem turned into a Movie: OLD HAT, by Sue Walker

    Watch Poem turned into a Movie: OLD HAT, by Sue Walker:

    Poem written and read by Sue Walker

    Visual Design and Editor by Yujin Song

    Produced by Matthew Toffolo

Note from the Writer Sue Walker:

The poem is memory and desire.

The poem begins with waiting, waiting for the man who didn’t get off the bus — and he blurs with the man who comes in the back door, who offers to show the woman love again–for desire is a recurrence. Like rain. She is the impossibility of truth, devastation and passion. She shifts back and forth — so that past is present and present is past.

Language calls into being the past and the moment of “now” when she goes into the kitchen and makes a mint julep. The narrator is a survivor. She knows the thrust of desire and she sees herself as she would be seen — young again. Silk sheets. And love that is predictable. As is rain.

Old Hat – Poetry Reading by Sue Walker

Wach the Poetry Reading – OLD HAT:

Poem read by Holly Sarchfield

Get to know Poet Sue Walker:

1) What is the theme of your poem?

I think the theme is the poem is aging and memory — the things memory holds to when moments are the past that is ever vibrant and alive.

2) How would you like people to respond when they read or watch your poetry reading?

I think that poems / poetry should strike some emotional chord — whether major or minor or even B-flat. I hope that listeners / readers say, “Ah, yes, it was like that — and maybe they’ll fix a mint julep and drink to memories of time past — like Proust: “A la recherche du temps perdu.”

3) How long have you been writing poetry?

Writing seriously since I was a English graduate student at Tulane University — though my Ph.D. was in Literature, not Poetry. I am the Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at the University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama, Poet Laureate of Alabama from 2003 – 2012, and I am the publisher of Negative Capability Pres (negative capability press.org).

4) Do you have a favorite poet?

I can’t say that I have one favorite poet. I try to keep up with the current poetry scene — and as a poetry publisher, the poets we publish are favorites. We have just published “A DAY LIKE TODAY by NY poet, Barbara Henning — and Lissa Kiernan,s (NY) book, TWO FAINT LINES IN THE VIOLET is an Indie finalist. Negative Capability Press published 14 books in 2014 and we have 15 books scheduled for 2015.

5) What influenced you to submit to WILDsound and have your poetry performed by a professional actor?

I am very interested in the intersection between performance and the written word. I think that words are sound, are motion, are the latest innovations that a chiastic intertwining of WILD SOUNDINGS.

6) Do you write other works? scripts? Short Stories? Etc..?

Yes, I write and have published 8 books of poetry, dhapbooks, a critical book on the ecology of James Dickey, some 60 or so critical articles on Carson McCullers (subject of my Ph.D. dissertation, Flannery O’Connor, Marge Piercy, Richard Eberhart, Karl Shapiro — to name a few. I have published drama, written and performed in one-woman – one-act plays, published fiction (flash fiction and short stories_ and nonfiction — and am enamored with hybrid works. Writing is breath, is inspiration, is joy.

7) What is your passion in life?

Writing, Publishing, Teaching. See Negative Capability Press – http://www.negativecapabilitypres.org — and like us — Negative Capability Press Facebook. Like WILDSOUND, I think that promoting art and artists is, perhaps, the ultimate fulfillment. Isn’t it, after all, an ax that breaks the frozen sea within us — and serves to right a world that needs writers to set the wrong right.