Category Archives: First Scene Screenplay

Watch 1st Scene Winning Script Reading STILL IN THE GAME (with interview)

And I have been very pleased with the feedback from WILDsound; in fact, it inspired a reworking of the entire screenplay. And I think it is much stronger as a result.

– Writer George Flowers

    Watch STILL IN THE GAME by George Flowers:

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Susan Wilson
    Barkley – Allan Michael Brunet
    Mel – Dan Fox
    Hooker – Pip Dwyer
    Kelly – Dan Cristofori
    Prostitute – Christina Aceto
    Karen – Krista Morin

Matthew Toffolo interviews George Flowers:

What is your screenplay about?

In short, STILL IN THE GAME is about two American men – one a 75-year-old comic, and the other a 78-year-old salesman – who reject the notion that retirement means that life’s productive period is over. Baseball great Yogi Berra’s famous quote: “It ain’t over ’til it’s over,” captures their spirit well, as they strive to milk every last drop of fun and adventure out of their remaining years (months, weeks, days).

Why should this script be made into a movie?

It’s hard to find a comedy today that is not laced with sexual and other profanities. I tried to lace this screenplay with comedy, and spice it with a slightly racy subtext (Barkley’s desire to have sexual relations with young women) and some occasional risqué moments. [By the way, he never has sex with young women (he’s a dreamer, which is why the script opens with a dream sequence]; later in the film, he has an opportunity to have a sexual tryst with a young woman, and he rejects her, later explaining to a friend: “I’ve had milk older than she is.”]

How long have you been writing stories?

I’ve been writing articles on show business, travel and food, as well as news stories and commercials for broadcast, for many years. I’ve been writing screenplays for about five years. In 1977, I wrote a manuscript for a novel; it was never published, although at one point it was being considered for an “ABC Movie of the Week.”

What movie have you seen the most in your life?

“Blazing Saddles.” Easily a dozen times over the years. But I gravitate to most anything Mel Brooks as often as possible.

What artists would you love to work with?

To work with, period! –

Jack Nicholson: An extraordinary talent who milks every drop out of every line, and always manages to steal the scene.

Morgan Freeman: He brings depth to his performances that I rarely see from today’s young crop of actors. He’s a class act, who never overacts, is smooth, and is always absolutely believable.

Sean Penn: I believe that Penn is what James Dean would have become, had he lived – a gifted, emotionally explosive presence in Hollywood – on-screen, as a writer, and as a director. He has matured wonderfully since the ‘80s.

Meryl Streep: She is versatile and just amazingly in-touch with the characters she plays – that is, she becomes so genuinely the person she is playing that she appears just to be living her life, and we are bystanders.

Anthony Hopkins: He is a magnificent actor, skilled in his craft in much the same way that Brando and Olivier were.

To work with in the role of Barkley –

I would love to have worked with Walter Matthau; in fact, the Barkley character was created as an homage or sorts to him. Matthau was a superb actor, who moved effortlessly between dramatic and comedic roles, although I feel his comedic work was his best. Others who could have played him are Leslie Nielsen and Jack Klugman. Elliot Gould could possibly play him today. I could easily see Jerry Stiller playing Barkley, too, although he’s too old for the part.

6. How many stories/screenplays have you written?

Screenplays: Six (STILL IN THE GAME is my first). Stories (articles and news stories, mostly): Thousands (I’ve written about a thousand articles in the last 25 years; news stories: countless (I’m a broadcast journalist); commercials, many hundreds over the years for radio and television.

7. Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

In my 30s again (I’m 68).

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I come up with a screenplay idea, and write about it (stream of consciousness) for a while, just to see where it goes. If it feels like a promising beginning – if the concept feels good, and the characters feel rich, I then write what I feel will be the last few scenes (on the belief that I have to know where I’m going in order to get there); the ending isn’t cast in stone – it may change, but at least I can plot a course and travel it.

Regarding character development, I have a lengthy interview process, where I interview myself as each major character. I need to know their life experiences: where they came from, what their parents did, what influenced them (positively and negatively). I write a sort of bible on each character. In a screenplay, we meet every character mid-life, and where they came from determines how and where they go forward.

I don’t have a set writing routine; the creative process respects no rules. When the juices are flowing, the fingers must be typing, and keep typing until the flow ends.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Eliminating injustice, doing away with racism, anti-Semitism, homophobia, and xenophobia, and counteracting climate change before it’s too late. (In other words, I want to be Miss America.) But they’re all true. I majored in psychology in college, and one of my professor’s used the term “generativity” to mean leaving the world a better place for those who follow. That is what I am passionate about!

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival? Did you enjoy the feedback you received?

I read the festival’s information on Film Freeway, and it sounded intriguing – and manageable: just the screenplay’s first ten pages; we’re not analyzing character development, arcs and plot resolutions – just the first few pages to see if viewers would get hooked. Nice!

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

There’s a story I tell when I speak with young writers; I’m not certain that it’s true, but its message certainly is. Allegedly, Earnest Hemmingway was scheduled to speak before an assembly of aspiring writers at a major university. Hundreds of students sat in the auditorium with pencils in-hand, waiting for the great Hemmingway to share his secrets for writing the great American novel. The author is said to have walked onto the stage, taken his place at the lectern, and paused for more than a few moments, just looking out at those assembled. When he spoke, he was short and to the point. He reportedly said: “So … you all want to be writers, eh? Then what the hell are you doing here? Why aren’t you home writing?” – and then he walked off the stage. There’s no substitute for exercising your creative muscles. Use them, or lose them. And best of luck to all of us.

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Deadline: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL Get it performed at the festival. Full feedback
http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback!

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Watch 1st Scene Screenplay Reading of FLAT PENNIES (plus interview)

I have to admit, when “Flat Pennies” performs well in some of the huge competitions this year, I will have to give WILDsound much credit for making my script stronger and far better.

– Writer Robert Ward

    Watch FLAT PENNIES First Scene Reading by Robert Ward:

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Susan Wilson
    Ian – Dan Fox
    Mrs. Guth – Pip Dwyer
    Matt/Tyler – Ryan Anning
    Antoinette- Christina Aceto

Matthew Toffolo interviews writer Robert Ward:

1. What is your screenplay about?

“Flat Pennies” follows a paraplegic man’s internal and outer struggles — from a lonely existence in a dark apartment filled with a sprawling model railroad all the way to finding love, happiness, and sunshine with the next-door neighbor who’s raising a young child and saddled with an abusive ex-husband. I have worked on this story for almost eight years, refining it over and over again. “Flat Pennies” is the toughest story I’ve ever written because it is extremely complex. Without giving away too much, the story also includes a strong, profound teenager who assists the man during his character arc.

2. Why should this script be made into a movie?

I strongly believe this story is so unique, so different from most of the usual theatrical offerings out there, that moviegoers would enjoy the ride greatly. I’ve always envisioned writing a story where people in theaters sit there after the final credits roll, their minds overwhelmed, taking it all in, wondering about what they just witnessed. And we’ve all been there. We know that feeling. It’s a wondrous sensation, sitting there in the semi dark and digesting a film just watched, truly affected, smitten and touched, and hopefully maybe even changed.

3. How long have you been writing stories?

I was a journalist for many years, but started my foray into fiction with “Flat Pennies” about eight years ago.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Definitely “Shawshank Redemption” since it was broadcast on a television network that played it almost around the clock for a couple of years. It’s actually a terrific movie, stuffed with great metaphor and allegory.

5. What artists would you love to work with?

I’ve always mentioned Billy Bob Thornton when asked, but after seeing “Game Of Thrones” the last couple of years, there are several awesome actors on that show that would be ideal, such as Iwan Rheon, Jerome Flynn, and Liam Cunningham. As for direction, I think Tim Burton or possibly the Coen Brothers would be perfect for “Flat Pennies.”

6. How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I have a dozen short screenplays (one entitled “The Final Job” that’s done really well on the contest circuit including a win here at the WILDsound Festival Short Screenplay Competition in 2013), plus I have the “Flat Pennies” feature screenplay along with 71,000 words toward the “Flat Pennies” novel. I’m really excited about the novel. It’s been a tremendous amount of work, especially tracking all that’s going on, a rough and slow slog as a matter of fact, but the end result will be something I’ll be extremely proud of for the rest of my life. I’ve gone deeper into the story, as you naturally would with a novel, and I attack the nitty gritty of the story’s historiography.

7. Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

One answer and one only… sitting on the deck of a beach house writing screenplays and novels.

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I do attempt sticking to a schedule, usually time in the late morning when it’s quietest. During my days of pounding keys in a newsweekly office, where I held several jobs plus a column, my mind was trained to filter out distractions. I recall copyediting and light proofreading articles while blaring “Nine Inch Nails” as background din through my earbuds. Where my girlfriend and I live at the moment, there is a lot of truck and city traffic rolling past my window. I barely hear it, though unfortunately, passing barking dogs and noisy children own me.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Bicycle riding has me by the throat. I’ve been riding ever since since I was six, really got into at 12, started long and even a few mountainous rides at 15 and 16, and have ridden almost daily from there on out. I either clear my mind through it as a catharsis, or ponder ideas further and farther as an incubator. I like power walking too just to mix things up. I’m an Oakland A’s fans and just two years ago, my girlfriend and I got immersed in a new passionate love, the San Jose Sharks NHL team.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival? Did you enjoy the feedback you received?

I really lucked out on this one. I enjoy the website Moviebytes.com. The guy who runs it, Frederick Mensch, does a nice job of posting a huge amount of contest info. I found the WILDsound Festival on that site. Regarding “Flat Pennies” you could say that WILDsound greatly affected the screenplay’s arc. The feedback was that good. Here’s an example… After reading the abundant feedback (I made a bullet list of the feedback’s main points and placed it next to my laptop), I not only completely changed the feature screenplay, but I printed the script out and I’m now in the process of injecting those changes into the novel as well. I have to admit, when “Flat Pennies” performs well in some of the huge competitions this year, I will have to give WILDsound much credit for making my script stronger and far better.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Ha! Proofread. Nothing turns off a reader more than typos and shoddy grammar. If you’re a professional writer or want to be a professional writer, act like it. Even in posts on forum threads, my writing is clean and errorless. I’ve worked way too hard to be a good writer and I don’t want to infect my style with disease in any manner.

    * * * * *

Deadline: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL Get it performed at the festival. Full feedback
http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback!

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL

Get your script performed at the festival. Full feedback on all entries:

http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback!

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Watch Recent Winning Readings:
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/1st_scene_readings.html

1st Chapter – DISTURBED
March 2015 Reading
Written by Suzanne Wilson
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/disturbed.html

1st Scene – THE SINGING TREE
March 2015 Reading
Written by Marilyn Pesola & Peter Moss
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_singing_tree.html

1st Scene – THE UMPIRE HAS NO BALLS
March 2015 Reading
Written by Debbie Bolsky
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/the_umpire_has_no_balls.html

1st Scene SCRIPT – LEGRAND
February 2015 Reading
Written by Angelina Carkic
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/1st_scene_readings.html

Interview with Debbie Bolsky, Winning 1st Scene Script Writer (The Umpire Has No Balls)

    Watch the Winning 1st Scene Screenplay Reading of “The Umpire Has No Balls”

    CAST LIST:

    NARRATOR – Val Cole
    Jessie – Melinda Michael
    Dutch – John Goodrich
    Catcher – Lucas James
    Ken Griffrey Jr./Sr. – Andrew Tite

Matthew Toffolo interviews Debbie Bolsky:

Matthew: What is your screenplay about?

Debbie: It’s the story of Jessie Stiles as she starts her journey through the umpire ranks to achieve her one goal in life – becoming a major league baseball umpire. But there’s one little problem – no woman’s ever broken through the stainless-steel ceiling of the MLB.

This dramedy with scatterings of romance follows Jessie as she fights her way toward achieving her goal – she is a woman who, not always successfully, tries to balance her life with her dreams. Interspersed throughout the script are interviews with real people involved in the game of baseball.

Matthew: Why should this script be made into a movie?

Debbie: It’s a good story that I think people will enjoy and it’s got some very strong roles especially for women.

Matthew: How long have you been writing stories?

Debbie: I’ve been writing since I was a kid but screenplays and stage plays pretty consistently for the past 15 years.

Matthew: What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Debbie: The Philadelphia Story and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Matthew: What artists would you love to work with?

Debbie: There are just too many to list and it would also depend upon the project.

Matthew: How many stories/screenplays have you written?

Debbie: I have over 10 screenplays and stage plays at different stages and that doesn’t count the ones I tossed in a drawer never to see the light of day again.

Matthew: Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

Debbie: I have no set routine. I’m the most undisciplined person in the world so when I start working on something I have to give myself a deadline. Then I’ll take many walks through the park and on the beach and think and talk to myself and make a lot of notes. When I have a handle on it I’ll pull out my laptop at home or in the library and start writing because after all, I have a deadline to meet.

Matthew: Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Debbie: Writing, baseball, friends and politics.

Matthew: That’s funny. Those probably would be my answers to that question too!

Matthew: What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Festival?

Debbie: I read about WILDsound in an email so I looked at their website, watched a couple of the readings then decided to submit to them.

Matthew: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Debbie: It would be presumptuous of me to give anyone advice so all I’ll say is so long as you enjoy it, keep writing, and rewriting, and rewriting, and rewriting…

    * * * * *

Deadline: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL Fet it performed at the festival, and get full feedback
http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback!

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Interview with John-Arthur Ingram, Winning 1st Scene Screenplay (Three Play)

This is the 5th or 6th time I’ve submitted a script to WILDsound over the past few years. But this is the first time I’ve actually broken through to the next round and will have something read. Haha. So thank you for that. I think it’s the timely and respectful feedback that has influenced me to enter the festival. For a reasonable price, I can get insightful feedback and a chance to have it read aloud. And it’s a chance you get monthly, which is cool.

– John Arthur-Ingram, on why he submits to the WILDsound Festival

Watch the 1st Scene Screenplay reading of THREE PLAY:

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sedina Fiati
Oliver – Jarrid Terrell
Blake – Robert Notman
Silvia – Erynn Brook

Matthew Toffolo interviews John-Arthur Ingram:

Matthew: What is your screenplay about?

John-Arthur: It’s a romantic comedy about being loved for who you really are.

Logline: Oliver, a neurotic who’s hopelessly in love with his best friend Blake, finally comes out to both his shameless girlfriend, Silvia, and Blake. This revelation backfires when Oliver discovers Silvia and Blake are in madly in love. As a final act of desperation, Oliver magically switches bodies with Silvia days before her wedding to Blake.
(My Best Friend’s Wedding meets A Midsummer Night’s Dream)

Oliver is planning to come out to Blake and Silvia at a production of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM in a city park in Tulsa, Oklahoma. What he doesn’t realize is that Blake and Silvia have been sleeping together. This becomes evident when he catches them having sex backstage. After all the secrets spill out over a confrontation, Oliver moves to LA and cuts them out of his life.

One year later, Blake and Silvia are getting married Tulsa. Blake wants Oliver there for a chance to reconcile their friendship before the wedding day. Silvia doesn’t. It takes a guilt trip from Oliver’s mother to persuade him to come back to Tulsa. Under Blake’s insistence, Oliver and Silvia attempt to resolve their friendship. This is done over pot brownies and wine at a theater production in the SAME city park as before. Oliver confesses his long time crush on Blake and desire to be Silvia. She confesses guilt about the past and cold feet about the future. And with a wish, Oliver and Silvia switch bodies.

Now, it’s two days before the wedding and the duo scramble to keep the switch a secret while looking for a way to fix their problems. First things first. The rules: Oliver cannot sleep with Blake. Silvia cannot out Oliver to his mom, Josephine. Meanwhile, Josephine is refusing the advances of a handsome suitor. She’s struggling to move on with her life after divorce; believing her husband is coming back. .

From a trip to the gun club, indoor soccer bachelor party, and hotel after party, Oliver and Silvia navigate the bachelor/bachelorette party in their new bodies. However, things gets crazy when, Marco, an old college friend, comes out to Oliver as Silvia and announces his love for Oliver. Blake questions his sexuality when Silvia as Oliver tries to seduce him. Everything unravels at the rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding forcing Oliver and Silvia to confront a decision about the future.

Ultimately, Oliver has to take ownership of his sexual identity and forgive Silvia by letting go of Blake. Silvia has to overcome her guilt and cold feet. Both have to stop being selfish. But will they switch back?

In the course of three days, we get a body swapping comedy that explores the theme: Being you is a constant you should never escape.

Matthew: Why should this script be made into a movie?

John-Arthur: Because I want to see these diverse group of characters represented in a story like this. Because this damn script won’t leave alone. Because I’m afraid of seeing too much of myself in this story. Because this script was one of the most fun I had writing and it helped shape my artistic goals.

Matthew: How long have you been writing stories?

John-Arthur: Since I started keeping a journal in 4th or 5th grade. Then writing dark and romantic lyrical poetry; mostly poor attempts at imitating Frost, Shelley, Keats, Browning, Swinburne, and Wilde. I didn’t discover screenwriting until about 6 years ago; 2009.

Matthew: What movie have I seen the most in my life?

John-Arthur: Let’s just say the original Star Wars trilogy and Indiana Jones are a given. With that in mind, it’s tie between The Rocketeer and Home Alone. Hahaha.

Matthew: What artists would you love to work with?

John-Arthur: I’m assuming you mean strictly in the film/tv industry? Off the top of my head: Alan Ball, Beau Willimon, Brad Pitt and Leo Dicaprio (don’t judge me!), Shonda Rimes, Ben Affleck (director), Steve Mcqueen, Ryan Murphy, Adrian Lyne, Jenji Kohan, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Sarah Treem, John Logan. Jason Katims.

If I could work with any artists of the past: Langston Hughes and Oscar Wilde.

Matthew: How many stories/screenplays have you written?

John-Arthur: — 4 original TV pilots
— 3 TV specs
— 3 co-written feature specs
— 2 writer for hire feature scripts
— 1 solo feature specs so far…Three Play!

Matthew: Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

John-Arthur: I would like to be in a reliable and trustworthy relationship with at least 2 indie production companies who enjoy supporting and collaborating with me in producing the types of stories I want to tell. And you know? Make a comfortable living from it all.

Matthew: Describe your process, do you have a set routine, method for writing?

John-Arthur: I fight to have at least 3 or 4 hours a day to just write or daydream of writing. Haha. I would call my method of writing, Anxious Curiosity. I’m fascinated by the fringes of the human psyche and the anatomy of the human condition. So I always begin with questions (including theme) then frame them in a narrative structure. I like to spend months just creating the main characters by writing their backstories/biographies; how they arrived at the place where the story begins. Then move forward.

I believe in the freedom of the first draft. Write it for yourself; however you want. I don’t believe I have to know my theme or everything about my story in the first couple of drafts. I just need to know where on the map I want to begin and where I want to end; not necessarily down to the house, but just what county/province I want arrive at. I’ll find the house when I get to the 4th or 5th draft…or I just rewrite the whole damn thing!

Matthew: Apart from writing, what else are passionate about?

John-Arthur: English Football. I’ve been a Liverpool FC fan since I was nine years old! YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE.

Matthew: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

John-Arthur: “Never tell me the odds.” Seriously, they’re frightening in this industry.

Just write the movie you want to see the best way you can. Over and over and over til you’re dead. Writing is the only thing we have control of.

Interview with Marilyn Pesola, Winner 1st Scene Screenplay Contest (The Singing Tree)

The more feedback we get, the better. WILDsound gave us fantastic feedback that reinforced our love for The Singing Tree.

Marilyn Pesola, on the WILDsound experience.

Watch 1st Scene Reading of “The Singing Tree” by Marilyn Pesola & Peter Moss

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sedina Fiati
Hellman – Jarrid Terrell
Colonel Richter – Robert Notman
Lt. Becker – Steve Rizzo
Voice on Phone – Roman Spera
Soldier – Peter Nelson
Mother – Erynn Brook

Matthew Toffolo interviews Marilyn Pesola:

Matthew: What is your screenplay about?

Winner of the 2013 Moondance International Film Festival.

From the darkness of war comes the need for one man’s salvation. Civilian stationmaster Kurt Hellmann can’t reconcile the atrocities of war. He blames himself for the death of 123 Jews due to a prank telephone call and, later on, envisions himself as the last Nazi mass murderer. The last straw is when the Nazis shoot the woman he loved, a Jew he had been hiding in his quarters until he could smuggle her out of the country. Too cowardly to stop Rachel’s execution lest he sign his own death warrant, he carves a swastika into his chest as a reminder that he couldn’t save her, then flees the war to seek salvation for all the wrong reasons. In the jungles of Brazil, blinded by the deep void in the center of what he thought were his values, he longs for punishment but does nothing when an opportunity presents itself — until the Nazi hunter of his nightmares shows up with his name on her list, the irony of which is that they become friends. Hellmann’s salvation finally comes from an unexpected source that reunites him with Rachel forever.

Matthew: Why should this script be made into a movie?

This is a unique, very different story then most Holocaust stories. There are many twists and turns and it offers a wide range of emotions — from hate and vengeance to sacrifice and forgiveness — The Singing Tree has it all. Many readers have said that the story is beautifully written, that it grabs them from the first page and doesn’t let go.

Matthew: How long have you been writing stories?

I haven’t written many stories. I’ve published one novel, Like Father Like Son. Peter Moss, my writing partner on this project, has published many books over the years, including The Singing Tree the New York Times called “a little gem.” It truly is a wonderful story.

Matthew: What movie have you seen the most in your life?

I love esoteric dramas. I have seen Ghost and Meet Joe Black many times, my two favorites. I don’t know about Peter’s choices.

Matthew: What artists would you love to work with?

So many wonderful artists today, so hard to choose!

Matthew: How many stories/screenplays have you written?

I have written two screenplays and Peter has turned some of his books into screenplays. He lives and writes in Hong Kong and Malaysia so I’m not up on all of his projects.

Matthew: Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

Still writing!

Matthew: Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I don’t have a set routine or a specific method for writing. If the characters don’t come alive for me, I have no story, and that sometimes happens. When they do come alive, I let them tell me their story. I’m their stenographer! Peter’s job is writing so he’s quite prolific. He’s a wonderful prose writer whose words sing on the page.

Matthew: Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

For me it would be helping new writers get published. I think for Peter it might be traveling because he does a lot of it.

Matthew: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Don’t put your words into your character’s mouths; let them say their own.

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL

The communication, organization and feedback these guys offer are fantastic and scriptwriters of all disciplines and experience should be jumping at the service WILDsound provide. The best thing about it is they are as enthusiastic as you about your work. Thank you to everyone involved with WILDsound.

– Grant Reid, on this 1st Scene Screenplay experience (review)

Deadline TODAY: FIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL Get your works showcased at 2015 festival events.
http://www.wildsound.ca/firstscenescreenplaycontest.html

– Submit the first stages of your film, get it performed at the festival, and get full feedback! At least 30 winners a month.

WATCH past 1st Scene Festival readings:

Watch February’s 1st Scene Screenplay Winning Readings:

Legrand, 1st Scene Screenplay Reading by Angelina Carkic

Hellcat, 1st Scene Screenplay Reading by Alan Hostetter:

The Curse Of Sam Hain – 1st Scene Script by Jacob F. Keller:

Sparks: 1st Scene Reading by Megan K. Bickel: