TV PILOT Screenplay Reading – ECHOES OF BONNIEVILLE by Simon Schneider

Watch the winning February 2017 TV PILOT screenplay.

Winning Screenplay – ECHOES OF BONNIEVILLE
Written by Simon Schneider

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Geoff Mays
TULLY – Talia Price
WILLIX – Casey Estey
OFFICE HICKS – Philip Krusto
PETER – John Lester Phillips
JAMIE – Ursina Luther

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Horror, Thriller, Crime

A small town is rocked by creepy deaths where the victims have willingly offered themselves as a sacrifice to some unknown dark force. Investigating the murders are Officer Hicks, Sherriff Healy and visiting expert on the occult Dylan Willix but with the two cops mistrusting Dylan, progress is slow. Meanwhile, bored checkout girl Tully begins to experience strange visions that may link to the force behind the deaths.

Get to know the writer:

What is your TV PILOT screenplay about?

Echoes of Bonnieville follows Detective Dylan Willix, an investigator of the paranormal and occult, into the sleepy town of Bonnieville as he chases his Moby Dick: a serial killer with supernatural abilities. Meanwhile at the local convenience store, a disenfranchised customer service assistant named Tully Moorehead has the tedium of her life shaken up by otherworldly when she starts having gruesome visions.

What genres does your screenplay fall under?

I think my pilot would fit in nicely in the current trend of cinematic television and it offers a shade of horror audiences won’t get from anywhere else.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over?

I try to watch as much as I possibly can but my personal highlights include Fargo, Stranger Things and of course Breaking Bad.

How would you describe this script in two words?

I’m going to cheat and use three: Otherworldly detective drama.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

This script has been in the works since I read Uzumaki, which was shortly after university in 2015. When I discovered Lovercraftian horror and how paralysing and twisted it could be I had to write my own. That’s when I started brainstorming.

How many stories have you written?

I’ve lost count. This is probably my forth big project, where I’ve set everything aside to make it perfect.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

The Lovecraft style of horror is so invasive and incomprehensible that I was compelled to give my version of it. When I researched how Lovecraft had been represented in recent times I felt that no one had quite done it justice, especially in television. It felt like an untapped market that audiences wanted to see and my confidence in that was what drove me.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I encountered the usual obstacles of procrastination, self-doubt and the inability to illustrate on the page what I had in my head. The more I rewrote the script the more distant these problems felt though.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I’m passionate about video games, especially the spectacularly gory ones. They’re something I grew up with and they offer an experience unlike any other medium.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I was influenced to submit to WILDsound because of a previous experience submitting work to their short film competition and receiving such thorough feedback. So far, I have received lots of feedback on Echoes of Bonnieville but by far WILDsound’s was the most astute as it highlighted issues which I entirely agreed with. Ironically however, the feedback suggested one of the characters being a little pantomime (which was a fair criticism) but his dialogue was mostly lifted from real life scenarios. Go figure.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

My biggest advice to other writers out there is practice your craft. There’s always more you can learn and if people aren’t responding to your work, its because it needs refining somewhere. I remember being naively self-assured about some of my old work and I look back at it now and cringe. Truthfully, writing is a growing experience.

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Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

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Dimitry Pompée – January 2017 TV PILOT Screenplay Winner

Watch the January 2017 Winning TV PILOT Screenplay.

Best Scene from the screenplay DOWN WITH THE BUREAUCRACY Screenplay
Written by Dimitry PompeeCAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sean Ballantyne
NATHAN – Gabriel Darku
KAREN/PAULA – Val Cole
LUKE – Nick Wicht
MYLES – Charles Gordon
ALLIE/NORA – Shannon McNally
QUINN – Catherine D’Angelo
BARLOWE – David Straus

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Political

After being framed for treason and losing his job at a prestigious DC lobbying firm, an arrogant grad student finds himself forced to take an entry-level position at the second-worst federal agency in America.

Get to know the writer:

What is your TV Pilot screenplay about?

My pilot, Down With The Bureaucracy, is about an arrogant graduate student named Nathan who is forced to take an entry-level position at the second-worst federal agency in America in order to keep his academic scholarship. While Nathan is hostile to all of his coworkers at first, he finds he must convince them to help him save his job when his spiteful manager tries to fire him on the first day.

Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

Aside from the fact that I think it would be a pretty funny show, I think there’s a huge audience for a sitcom about how ridiculous it can be working at the lower rungs of the federal government. We certainly have some amazing shows like Veep that mock the people in the corridors of power, but there are plenty of people in the lesser-known agencies who could use the same treatment.

At the same time, I also want to create a show that demonstrates the good that the federal workforce can do. Not only could this show derive material from the incompetence of the federal bureaucracy, it can show that there are plenty of talented and dedicated federal employees who are keeping this country afloat. I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of a better way to endear people to their government than through a show about a group of bumbling coworkers who occasionally manage to do a decent job. Well, aside from a civics class.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Utterly rewarding.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

It’s only rounding out its second season, but I think I’ve watched every episode of NBC’s Superstore about seventeen times each. It’s an excellent example of how to use an ensemble cast full of absurd characters to create a compelling and hilarious sitcom. The same can be said of The Good Place, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Community, Parks and Rec, 30 Rock, and all the other shows I find myself watching again and again.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’ve been working on this one for about two years and a half now. I recently compared the first draft from May 2014 with this current draft, and while many of the core pieces remain intact, it is radically different than it used to be. Hopefully, it’s better too!

How many stories have you written?

This is a difficult question to answer, because I have several scripts in various stages of “completion.” I would say that I have four scripts in what you might call late-stage drafts, and many others that are in earlier stages of editing, drafting, outlining, or nascent, amorphous chaos.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

When I was in grad school, I was also working full-time and I was very unhappy with my employment situation. I was bored and frustrated, and all of my job applications were met with silence, so I felt like I was stuck. I can’t even remember what the situation was, but one day, some nonsense happened at work and I said something to the effect of, “That is so stupid, it could be in a sitcom.” I started writing that very night. And I did end up leaving that job for something much better soon after, but not before taking extensive notes about working there that I’ve used in my pilot.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I don’t believe it’s done yet, but there have been some obstacles in getting it to this point. The most vexing obstacle for me was and remains developing a consistent writing habit, then sticking to it. I try do some writing during lunch at work, and then after coming home and foraging through the fridge for a somewhat healthy dinner, I write some more. Some days are better than others, but I figure as long as I can get SOMETHING down every day, I can count it as a success.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Video games, a free and open internet, and naps. Pretty much anything I can do on my couch.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I entered the festival precisely because of the reputation of the feedback. It can be challenging to find sources for insightful feedback when you’re outside of an academic or professional setting, especially if you’re just starting out and you have no connections. Several friends of mine who had previously entered the festival told me that the feedback they received was incredibly helpful, and I absolutely agree. After digesting and utilizing the notes I received, I can say with utmost certainty that my script is leagues ahead of where it was before the festival.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Many people have said this in much more insightful ways, but I’d advise other writers to always be open to receiving constructive feedback, and to seek it out specifically. It’s not easy hearing something you’ve been working on for a long time isn’t as good as you think it is, but receiving that type of criticism is essential to developing your skills as a writer. Don’t take it personally, don’t ignore it, and use it to improve your work.

****
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson


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Erica Barfield Peterson – December 2016 TV Screenplay Winner

THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MIDLIFE CRISIS TV Pilot
Written by Erica Peterson
Read 10 Questions with the writerCAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Michelle Alexander
MARK – Ucal Shillingford
LEATHERFACE – Noah Casey
JANICE/ALEXIS – Angela Cavallin
MADISON/CHRISSY – Dana Thody
PHARMACIST – Sean Ballantyne
BETT – Chris Reid Geisler

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Horror

On his 40th birthday, Leatherface has decided it’s time to “find his truth,” so he reaches out to the one person who can help him… his only victim that got away.

Get to know the winning writer:

1. What is your screenplay about?

It’s the story of Leatherface (from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre) turning 40 and realizing the life he’s been living may not be the life he wants. Maybe he doesn’t want to hack people to death. Maybe he doesn’t want to eat people at every meal. Maybe he loves candle making but will never know until he goes on a journey to find his truth, and the only way he knows how to do that is with the aid of his one victim who got away – Mark. Mark survived, lived to tell the tale and even wrote a book about how he learned to live his truth because of what he went through. It’s an Odd Couple story in which both Mark and Leatherface realize how much they can truly help each other find their truths.

2. How does this episode fit into the context of the series?

I think it makes a great buddy comedy. You have two people trying to figure out how they want to live their lives and can only do so with the help of the other. One being a semi-successful self-help author and the other is a murderous psychopath. Each episode the two characters can have new goals of things they either will or won’t want as a part of their new lives. Leatherface has never dated before, never driven — basically never done much other than kill people, so there’s definitely an engine for plenty of stories. Mark is scared of life and wants to learn how to live it to the fullest which is also a great engine for many stories. I think it’s something we’ve never seen before in terms of pairing comedy and horror in the odd couple sense for a TV series.

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Delightfully Psycho.

4. What TV show do you watch over and over again?

Arrested Development is by far my favorite. That and anything that profiles serial killers.

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I worked on this particular pilot for three months.

6. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written 10 specs and 7 pilots.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I’m obsessed with the genre blend of horror and comedy. I had just seen “What We Do In The Shadows” and was like, “That’s what I want to do!” I kind of knew that all along because my favorite movie is “Young Frankenstein,” and I adore “Shaun of the Dead” but it just clicked that day, and I knew I had found my niche. I’m also so fascinated by Leatherface because we never hear him speak and I always wondered — would his life be different if he was taken in by a more “normal” family. Does he ever want to tell his mama to shove off cause he just wants to listen to music or kiss a girl? — so I wanted to explore the question of what would he be like if he came to that realization himself.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

None, really. This was one of those times where I loved every moment of writing this because it’s something I am passionate about so it made it fun. I couldn’t wait to finish to get feedback and make it better and better.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love to dance (was a semi-professional football cheerleader — will not tell you the team name because there are embarrassing photos out there), animals, fighting for the rights of others, making people laugh, sleep and donuts (GOD I LOVE DONUTS).

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I wanted to see what people thought of my script. Sometimes you give your writing to people and worry that they’re just being nice because they know you — with this — you didn’t have to be nice, and you were wonderful! The feedback was great and encouraging. Now I just gotta get those rights from Tobe Hooper!

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Just keep writing and always write. Write what you’re passionate about – not what you think other people want to read. Read scripts – lots of them. Nail down structure and story — if you can get those two things done well then the rest is a piece of cake. Also, forget doubting yourself. You’re not here to please anyone but yourself. If you’re writing to make money and wouldn’t write if you couldn’t make money — maybe you shouldn’t be a writer. And always be willing to take feedback — especially if you get the same note from several people. The goal is to get better and not think that you are already the best.

***

Producer/Director: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson


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SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or FEATURE Script
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SCREENPLAY CONTESTFIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY CONTEST
Submit the first stages of your film and get full feedback!

Watch the 2016 TV PILOT Winners from the WILDsound Screenplay Festival (18)

Since we started performing TV PILOT screenplays at the festival in 2008, the industry of developing pilots has changed dramatically. There are now 100s of more television shows being created a year because of the large growth of web platforms like Netflix. To add to that, there are now more television stations desperate for solid content looking for that next great television show.

We performed 18 original television pilots in 2016 and are eyeing to perform at least twice as many in 2017.

Deadline for Television Pilot/Spec Screenplay Festival: https://tvfestival.org/

ACTORTV PILOT – MIDLIFE CRISIS
December 2016 Reading
Written by Erica Barfield Peterson
ACTORTV PILOT BEST Scene Screenplay – ARMS OF MORPHEUS
November 2016 Reading
Written by John Christopher Thomas
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay: WILLOWWOOD
October 2016 Reading
Written by Christopher Locke
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay: EMMETT IN PEOPLELAND
October 2016 Reading
Written by Larry Hankin
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay: THE VISA
October 2016 Reading
Written by Conrad Haynes
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – OYMPUS RISING
September 2016 Reading
Written by C M Landrus
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – DIGITAL NATIVES
August 2016 Reading
Written by Adam Preston
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – SURVEILLANCE
August 2016 Reading
Written by Chris Gebhardt & Jenn Russi
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – THE SPECTRAL CITY
July 2016 Reading
Written by Arthur Vincie
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – WILD MAGIC
June 2016 Reading
Written by Julie Nichols
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – CIVILIAN
June 2016 Reading
Written by Gina Scanlon
ACTORFAN FICTION Screenplay – SPACE 2099 (based on Space 1999)
June 2016 Reading
Written by Kevin D Story
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – THE REAPER: REBELLION “AFTERLIFE”
May 2016 Reading
Written by Mark S. MacDonald, Darsey Meredith
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – SMITHEREENS
May 2016 Reading
Written by Hershel D. Rephun
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – MAILROOMIES
April 2016 Reading
Written by Jacques Edeline
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – REC’D
March 2016 Reading
Written by Chris Courtney Martin
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – MINDWALKER
February 2016 Reading
Written by Thorsten Loos
ACTORTV PILOT – LACIE BIDWELL
January 2016 Reading
Written by Jameel Khan
ACTORTV PILOT – LIFE IN THE FAST LANE
January 2016 Reading
Written by Debi Calabro

***

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Editor: John Johnson

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Deadline Today for TV Pilot/Spec Festival – Holiday Special. Save 30%

SUBMIT your TV PILOT or TV SPEC Script
Voted #1 TV Contest in North America.

Deadline: TV PILOT/SPEC Script Festival – Get FULL FEEDBACK. Get script performed by professional actors. SAVE 30% off the regular submission today. 
http://www.wildsound.ca/tvscreenplaycontest.html

Watch WINNING TV PILOT Screenplay Readings
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/tv_pilot_readings.html

Watch WINNING TV SPEC Screenplay Readings
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/tv_spec_readings.html

READ 100s of testimonials for past submitters –
TV Screenplay Testimonials from the WILDsound Festival

WATCH RECENT TV SCREENPLAY FESTIVAL READINGS

ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – THE SPECTRAL CITY
July 2016 Reading
Written by Arthur Vincie
ACTORTV SPEC Screenplay – BROOKLYN NINE-NINE
June 2016 Reading
Written by Linsen Oyosa
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – WILD MAGIC
June 2016 Reading
Written by Julie Nichols
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – CIVILIAN
June 2016 Reading
Written by Gina Scanlon
ACTORFAN FICTION Screenplay – SPACE 2099 (based on Space 1999)
June 2016 Reading
Written by Kevin D Story
ACTORTV SPEC Screenplay – THE MINDY PROJECT “Culture Club”
May 2016 Reading
Written by Katie Bero
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – THE REAPER: REBELLION “AFTERLIFE”
May 2016 Reading
Written by Mark S. MacDonald, Darsey Meredith
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – SMITHEREENS
May 2016 Reading
Written by Hershel D. Rephun
ACTORFan Fiction Screenplay – TWILIGHT ZONE “Punchline”
April 2016 Reading
Written by Jaime Medina
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – MAILROOMIES
April 2016 Reading
Written by Jacques Edeline
ACTORFan Fiction Screenplay – MAGNUM P.I.
March 2016 Reading
Written by Lew Ritter
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – REC’D
March 2016 Reading
Written by Chris Courtney Martin
ACTORBest Scene TV Pilot – MY LIFE WITH STELLA KANE
February 2016 Reading
Written by Linda Morganstein
ACTORTV SPEC Screenplay – THE BIG BANG THEORY
February 2016 Reading
Written by David Minaskanian
ACTORTV PILOT Screenplay – MINDWALKER
February 2016 Reading
Written by Thorsten Loos
ACTORTV PILOT – LACIE BIDWELL
January 2016 Reading
Written by Jameel Khan
ACTORTV SPEC – UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT
January 2016 Reading
Written by Jen Turriff
ACTORTV PILOT – LIFE IN THE FAST LANE
January 2016 Reading
Written by Debi Calabro

TV SPEC – RICK AND MORTY TV Show by Matthew Feldman

TV SPEC of RICK and MORTY
Written by Matthew Feldman
CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Michelle Alexander
MORTY – Noah Casey
RICK – Brian Carleton
BETH – Dana Thody
JESUS CHRIST – Chris Reid Geisler
SUMMER – Angela Cavallin
FLUXO – Ucal Shillingford

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Animation, Adventure

Rick and Beth go on an interstellar vacation. Back on earth, Morty recieves unexpected help on his history project while Summer finds a new love interest.

Get to know the winning writer:

1. What is your screenplay about?

Beth is approached for her expertise in horse surgery to save a dying alien species from extinction and manages to convince Rick to tag along for a crazy adventure. Meanwhile at home, Morty seeks help from a notable icon to help with history homework to discover he isn’t exactly who he thought he was.

2. How does this episode fit into the context of the series?

I feel Rick and Morty’s success stems from many of their storylines discussing pop culture and frequently explored sitcom subjects to approach them in a way unexpected to the audience. Given that signature style of story telling, I feel my spec. is in line with your prototypical episode by both satirizing the film “The Hangover” and approaching the religious figure of Jesus in an unexpected way.

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Unconventionally controversial.

4. What TV show do you watch over and over again?

I have two televisions series I enjoy to re-watch. I love re-watching both Rick and Morty and Curb Your Enthusiasm. I feel like the writing in both those series have phenomenal, atypical, comedy writing that doesn’t compare to much of what is currently out there. The way they approach their storytelling is so unique, I always re-watch those shows to get a different take on watching the same episode again.

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I would say this screenplay took me roughly two and half months to produce the first draft. Then I spent a few more months accumulating notes and improving the quality of the story. In total, I probably spent five months working on this screenplay.

6. How many stories have you written?

Thus far, I’ve written seven stories.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I’m very interested in pursing a career as a screenwriter as my passion is the art of storytelling. In order to show case my work, I thought it would be best to write sample material for one of my favorite shows, thus writing a spec. episode of Rick and Morty.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

For those who have watched Rick and Morty before, many will notice the voices of the characters are quite peculiar. That said, it was quite an obstacle trying to accurately replicate both Rick and Morty’s voices. Rick often interrupts people while talking, he burps in the middle of talking, he’ll interrupt himself to drink from his flask. On the other hand, Morty often stutters when talking, is uncertain of himself, and finds himself repeating Rick’s name several times over while chatting with Rick. It took along time of watching the existing episode of Rick and Morty to assure I got those nuanced details just right.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Apart from writing, I’m very passionate about music. I’ve spent 10 years playing piano and 15 years playing trombone. I believe I have a rather wide musical palette enjoying musical genres ranging from Country to Rock to Classical.

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

As a relatively new writer, I’m still trying to discover my voice, in addition to identifying flaws in my writing. As a result, I identified several writing festivals that were know for providing stellar feedback on scripts and thus decided to submit my script to Wildsound. Upon submitting an early draft of my script to wild sound, their feedback helped me identify problems in my script which guided me in future re-writes to better improve the quality of my script.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

If there is anything I’ve learned from my several years writing, the art of writing is something that improves with time, practice, and feedback. Write a script, make it as good as you can, and don’t be intimidated to distribute it/ask for feedback. If you fear your work being stolen, don’t be. Writers are often egotistic and would never have the ability to pass off someone elses work as their own. Other writer’s will help identify the problems you aren’t seeing in your works and will often help you improve as a writer. Although, take advice with a grain of salt. All writer’s have different tastes and opinions, so don’t feel you need to take every note you are given. Get as many notes as you can, as the comments consistent across several writer’s will typically guide yo to where your work needs improvement

***

Producer/Director: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson


TV CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or TV SPEC Script
Voted #1 TV Contest in North America.
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your Best Scene Screenplay or FEATURE Script
FULL FEEDBACK on all entries. Get your script performed
SCREENPLAY CONTESTFIRST SCENE (first 10pgs) SCREENPLAY CONTEST
Submit the first stages of your film and get full feedback!

Read the best of TV PILOT Loglines for November 2016:

Deadline: TV PILOT/SPEC Script Festival – Get FULL FEEDBACK. Get script performed by professional actors
http://www.wildsound.ca/tvscreenplaycontest.html

Read the best of TV PILOT Loglines for November 2016: 

SUERHEROINE AND HER FATHER, by Terezia Kontova
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/superheroine_and_her_father_by_terezia_kontova.html

PRICE, by Emanuel Espinoza
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/price_by_emanuel_espinoza.html

RENTAL, by Adam C. Beal
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/rental_by_adam_c_beal.html

TODAY, by Stefanie Holzberer
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/today_by_stefanie_holzberer.html

PLIGHT OF THE IMMORTAL, by Chiara Forestieri
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/plight_of_the_immortal_by_chiara_forestieri.html

 

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Watch WINNING TV PILOT Screenplay Readings
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/tv_pilot_readings.html

Watch WINNING TV SPEC Screenplay Readings
http://www.wildsoundfestival.com/tv_spec_readings.html

READ 100s of testimonials for past submitters –
TV Screenplay Testimonials from the WILDsound Festival